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Forever after soil mix.

Discussion in 'Organics' started by karmaxul, Mar 17, 2017.

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  1.  
    karmaxul

    karmaxul Well-Known Member

    Hello all. I am a fertilizer free grower though I also do not use any additives besides Worm Castings, Alaskan humus, cheap peat for 4 dollars a bail as it does not have trichoderma which most everything does now unfortunately, and regular natural unfertilized clay soil. I feed my plants only water. My outdoor is on year three.

    The mix which I have yet to see higher quality from is
    50% Worm castings (high quality compost can be used in place)
    25% Clay soil
    25% Cheap peat
    Atleast a handfull of Alaskan humus.

    I feed only water and never anything else.

    A couple tricks. Keep it wet. It is not the same as using ions to feed the plant where due to limited diversity the interior of the pot needs to dry out. Keep the top a nice wet color. If it drys you could experience some yellowing.

    No soil is nutrient deficient only deficient of life.

    If you want to recharge your soil between uses you can simply keep a worm bin and mix it in with your trim for your worms to process though if it is kept at the proper humidity it will last and last. Your plants will adjust the fungal to bacterial dominance and like a fine wine will become tuned in by the cannabis plant to its liking, over time.

    Is 50% castings overkill? Maybe though would you like room for error or do you want to run it as a science lab weighting your soil for proper moisture and watering every couple hours to keep proper humidity?

    Most powdered mycorrihizae has trichoderma added which is a parasitic fungi. One issue with this, that your fertilizer companies likely know about, is that it is activated in high humic acid levels which castings and or compost have, setting growers up for failure as the healthiest of soils have natural high levels of quality humic acid not the old coal derived form sold in the grow shops. Most bails of 25 dollar grow mix peat now has trichoderma too unfortunately. I think one of sunshine mix products my not though Ill take the 4 dollar bail. It is a bit harder to wet though not when mixed and only if it drys as the microbes can produce a hydrophobic layer to protect themselves from drought.

    Some of my flavors last up to an hour after smoking with extreme intensity.

    Works great indoors too. I prefer fabric pots myself though they are not necessary. I prefer white fabric pots as well
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2017
    jessluvstosmoke likes this.
  2.  
    Purpnugz

    Purpnugz Well-Known Member

    What was the recipe again ?
    50% ewc
    25% soil
    25% peat
    And a handful of humus?
     
    karmaxul likes this.
  3.  
    karmaxul

    karmaxul Well-Known Member

    Yes alaskan humus has the thickest mycorrhizae hyphae and the only source of mycorrhizae with out trichoderma. Feel free to use more then a handful if you have the money. A hand full would be fine for 10 gallons I would imagine. Or put a bit less under your plant on transplant and it will spread through the soil on the roots.

    If your buying castings in a grow shop they should have wiggle worm or I was impressed with how roots and harmonys castings looked. I buy by the ton for my field. I have contacts if you need in the US
     
    jessluvstosmoke likes this.
  4.  
    Purpnugz

    Purpnugz Well-Known Member

    Can I use native soil? I raked aside all these leaves to make a bed and this dirt is crawling with worms.
     
    jessluvstosmoke likes this.
  5.  
    Purpnugz

    Purpnugz Well-Known Member

    IMG_0805.JPG
     

    Attached Files:

    karmaxul likes this.
  6.  
    karmaxul

    karmaxul Well-Known Member

    Native soil is best as it will be teaming with microbes catered to your climate. Speaking of leaves, outdoor soil does best with a heavy layer of mulch. There are many options though unless you have a blight, rust or smut, you can rarely go wrong with leaves, unless your in a windy area that is. Looking good

    If you use straw you can apply corn gluten to keep the seeds, that are likely in it, from germinating. Its what many a golf coarse use for an herbicide. Best to apply in early spring then again in fall
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
  7.  
    iHearAll

    iHearAll Well-Known Member

    Got any pics ? I would love to see your results.
     
  8.  
    karmaxul

    karmaxul Well-Known Member

    Finished product or presently growing? I may have some of last years field? Left my pc in central america though I can check my phone or email
     
  9.  
    Purpnugz

    Purpnugz Well-Known Member

    IMG_0826.JPG Hardening
     
    iHearAll likes this.
  10.  
    Olive Drab Green

    Olive Drab Green Well-Known Member

    They aren't getting enough light, indicated by their stretchiness.
     
  11.  
    Purpnugz

    Purpnugz Well-Known Member

    Yea I started them with a little t5. Plan on moving them outdoors tomorrow.
     
  12.  
    Olive Drab Green

    Olive Drab Green Well-Known Member

    I'm sure they'll be alright, just make sure you find them some good light.
     
    Purpnugz likes this.
  13.  
    karmaxul

    karmaxul Well-Known Member

    Pirate bugs on the way (dispensary goon infested me with thrips in the dead of winter). Snowy out though with the door open I got it down to 74 with the fans exhausting full speed
     

    Attached Files:

    greasemonkeymann likes this.
  14.  
    karmaxul

    karmaxul Well-Known Member

    I know it dirty though they crashed in my roof too. That's my dead winter harvest on the floor. Tryed giving out free clones to celebrate legalization. Greedy bastards with shitty quality
     
  15.  
    greasemonkeymann

    greasemonkeymann Well-Known Member

    hopefully that's cut with a good 40% aeration?
    if not i'd advise highly to do so..
     
    Olive Drab Green likes this.
  16.  
    Purpnugz

    Purpnugz Well-Known Member

    Perlite?
     
    greasemonkeymann likes this.
  17.  
    greasemonkeymann

    greasemonkeymann Well-Known Member

    sure, perlite, vermiculite, volcanic rock, biochar, clay pellets, rice hulls etc.
    also the humus is redundant because of the fresh castings, if the OP claims that the needed myco is in the Alaskan humus it's virtually useless applied in that fashion, it must be applied on the roots themselves
    personally I prefer a separate application of the myco to ensure it's applied correctly.
    mist the roots at transplant, and sprinkle the myco in it.
    this is the myco I prefer.
    no trichodermas either, and it's the correct type of myco
    mykos.jpg
     
    vino4russ likes this.
  18.  
    karmaxul

    karmaxul Well-Known Member

    In soils deficient of life that are "charged" you need aeration though with life and no phosphorus or other ppms that kill life, like salt on a slug it is not needed. My soils like it wet at all times which is completely different then growing with fertilizers where the inside needs to dry due to the limited diversity and health of the soil where in fact anaerobic bacteria can build up which is why it needs to dry between watering. Most microbial grows are called that for show though with charging the soil its so vastly limited and in these case you need aeration. The oxygen saturation of water is 10 percent in soils under far conditions and as long as people are not feeding them sugars the bacteria does not double in mass every 20 minutes sufficating out the soil food web making it ineffective. These folks need added ions and aeration though there is another level. A level nature is well familiar with.
     
  19.  
    karmaxul

    karmaxul Well-Known Member

    Biochar is loaded with toxins. Its a biproduct of energy production and it should not be used for many reasons from its structure to incombant residual toxins and heavy metals. Most samples at biochar fairs turn up dirty and the rest promote bioslime that festers anaerobic bacteria. That myco along with every other powdered one has trichoderma in it. Its sold by a fertilizer company. Its not more then a pony show which does little accept give bad results making people think they need the multi billion dollar fertilizer industry. I had a product years ago. Infact it was the only one in the first annual organic issue of high times. I know the industry and Im sorry to tell you they are thieves for the most part. If you want mycorrhizae use alaskan humus. Will the powder work with ferts, sure though in a quality soil it is a limiting factor. It brings quality up to a C minus and holds it there. I want the 4.0

    I also have an issue with aluminum silicate though not as much as with biochar. Perfect example of one mans trash is anothers treasure only the ones selling it are likely running syngas generators which are cool in many ways though they should not promote the waste to be greedy especially with its true value. Trichoderma is activated with humic acid. You either have no fungi or no diversity where you get your true fertilizer free quality from. My favors can last an hour after smoking not some ion heavy crap you taste for like a second and think, was that mint?

    Seriously this thread is not about some hempys hybrid. Microbes like it wet. If you have not grown this way try it or read and learn, please. If you have questions how my mix works thats great though Im not digging your recommendations at all. I recommend Elaine Ingham and Jeff Lowenfels work. Try watching searching on youtube, Elaine Ingham, common ground, hawaii, 2012. I have it memorized. Its a 36 hour lecture though please no hempies and hydro shop advice. She has mulitple doctorates and founded the soil food web. Monsanto products and hempys. What they hell happened to the industry? I feel like Im stuck in a bad dream
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
  20.  
    greasemonkeymann

    greasemonkeymann Well-Known Member

    ah no shit, lets talk about them.
    You seem a lil aggressive so lets return that

    First, the biochar most used is made from pure hardwood, meant for bbqing, not some fancy repackaged shit that a hydro guy would buy.
    so your qualms with that are wrong.

    2nd adding myco as a humus is not how myco works, not to mention you don't think that humus doesn't have trichodermas in I?t (which is asinine anyways as trichodermas are beneficial in a living soil)
    the myco I recommended has 300 propagules per gram of the single exact endo myco, and NO trichodermas.
    The type is Rhizophagus irregularis (also know as Glomas intradices)

    In a recent study, G. intraradices was found to be the only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that was able to control nutrient uptake amounts by individual hyphae depending on differing phosphorus levels in the surrounding soil
    (that's a cut and paste)

    Now, as far as your hatred for Monsanto, right on brother, we share that.
    I appreciate your references as well, as I've read them all in fact.

    You didn't address that your mix is not fungal but actually bacterial, and neither did you address that it's "phosphorus free"...

    I don't buy that your "flavors" last an hour either.
     
    Heil Tweetler likes this.
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