**IS NETTLE TEA FERTILIZER OK TO USE FOR CANNABIS?**

Discussion in 'Organics' started by mainliner, Aug 16, 2014.

  1.  
    mainliner

    mainliner Well-Known Member

    im new to all this organic stuff, and teas etc , but iv been reading up on nettle teas , its easy to make and is a good source of nitrogen,iron,mag,sulfut,,,,,thus maybe a silly question but is it good to use on mu plants ?? Thank u
     
  2.  
    a senile fungus

    a senile fungus Well-Known Member

    Stop posting random threads and actually do a damn search.
     
    Mazer and Sativied like this.
  3.  
    mainliner

    mainliner Well-Known Member

    i have done a search on google that's why i know how its made and what' nutriients are in it,, i was just wondering if its ok to use on cannabis plants , because i cant find any info ,,,,,,, ( in a non angry , more puzzeled tone,). Are you a bit slow,,,,,,you and sativeid , ignored , maybe even reported , ???strange kids??
     
  4.  
    a senile fungus

    a senile fungus Well-Known Member

    The answer to your question is in the first three stickies of this organics section. In the first post of those stickies.

    Your answer is probably in every single thread in this section, and labeled very clearly, but I didn't bother to check the rest. That's your job.
     
  5.  
    a senile fungus

    a senile fungus Well-Known Member

    I will not speak to you via PM.
     
  6.  
    a senile fungus

    a senile fungus Well-Known Member

  7.  
    a senile fungus

    a senile fungus Well-Known Member

  8.  
    a senile fungus

    a senile fungus Well-Known Member

  9.  
    a senile fungus

    a senile fungus Well-Known Member

    So to answer your question, yes.

    And if you've got Sativied on ignore you're losing out on a valuable resource...

    Have a wonderful day.
     
  10.  
    brewing up

    brewing up Well-Known Member

    • Stinging nettle is high in nitrogen, calcium, iron,vitamins A,B, & C, phosphorus, potassium, boron, iron, zinc, selenium, and magnesium. A natural insect repellant, when sprayed on leaves it can help plants resist insect and fungal attacks.
     

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