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New Cree J Series 3030

Discussion in 'LED and other Lighting' started by Prawn Connery, Nov 11, 2017.

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    Prawn Connery

    Prawn Connery Well-Known Member

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    Stephenj37826

    Stephenj37826 Well-Known Member Rollitup Advertiser

    Meh..... Sanan built them in China. Probably hit similar numbers with several 3030s out there. Look into Lumileds. Those things are everywhere and I haven't crunched the exacts but this looks to be middle of the road.
     
    Prawn Connery and ttystikk like this.
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    Dave455

    Dave455 Well-Known Member

    Nice looking spectral chart on the 90 CRI 3000 color series. Nice red peak for flower !!
    Strips in this color would be great.
     
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    CobKits

    CobKits Well-Known Member Rollitup Advertiser

    Spectrum looks pretty much like every other 3000k 90 phosphor white
     
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    Randomblame

    Randomblame Well-Known Member

    Looks like one generation behind latest Samsungs..
    For example, LM561c offers 34,5lm at 65mAmA in 3000°k/CRI80, that's +2,5lm and the LM301b offers 36lm at 65mA, that's +4lm.
     

    Attached Files:

    Prawn Connery likes this.
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    Randomblame

    Randomblame Well-Known Member

    But those numbers still looking good and comparable to latest EB Series, gen.2. If you can get the best binnings and the price is low, why not ...? But only if they are cheaper than the new EB series, which will arrive soon.
     
    Prawn Connery likes this.
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    Prawn Connery

    Prawn Connery Well-Known Member

    The fact they are rated at up to 240ma at 101 degrees C, does that provide any advantage over the others? For example, if your room naturally ran hot (which mine does).
     
    Colo MMJ likes this.
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    Randomblame

    Randomblame Well-Known Member

    Compare absolut max. ratings and then compared both thermal derating curve at 40° Ta. That's from LM561c datasheet.
    I doubt that you will get such high temperatures on a strip with proper cooling even at 50° T.a or do you really want to drive them at 240mA?
    At 240mA/105°T.j a 3000°k/CRI80 3030 diode would probably be anywhere between 110 and 120lm/w.
     

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    Prawn Connery

    Prawn Connery Well-Known Member

    The Crees were offered as a possible replacement for the Nichia 757s on the Cutter strips I was hoping to order, but now look to be out of stock.

    Maybe I'm missing something, but I can't actually find any Lumiled 3030 chips in the same class to rival the Crees/Samsungs/Nichias etc. I'll have another look . . .
     
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    Dave455

    Dave455 Well-Known Member

    Yes. correct. Now what LED strip light has 90 CRI, 3000k color temp. with the higher red. ?
     
    ganjamystic likes this.
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    Randomblame

    Randomblame Well-Known Member


    As brighter or as cheaper replacement?
     
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    CobKits

    CobKits Well-Known Member Rollitup Advertiser

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    Stephenj37826

    Stephenj37826 Well-Known Member Rollitup Advertiser


    You are correct. 3030 2D is behind I see. You should ask around though. Sometimes higher flux bins than are in the data sheet are available. Nichia are really good. Samsung LM301B will be impressive once we can get them..... Hold tight we have a trick or 2 up our sleeves. We will be posting some new sphere data in 2-3 weeks of some of our projects. Higher end stuff but absolutely amazing.
     
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    Randomblame

    Randomblame Well-Known Member

    You can get CRI90 strips with LM561C on Alibaba. @VegasWinner seems to have a reputable seller which makes strips in CRI80 and CRI90. Ask him for contact data...
     
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    Prawn Connery

    Prawn Connery Well-Known Member

    Just something they have on hand, as they've run out of 2000K Nichia's - which is what I originally wanted - and they may not have enough 3000K Nichias for my needs. I liked the idea of the Nichias, but don't know anything about the new Cree J Series, which is why I thought I'd ask for opinions here.
     
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    Randomblame

    Randomblame Well-Known Member

    If you like using lower kelvin temps have a look at the pdf below.
    Luxeon fresh focus(fresh and marbled meat) diodes have ~1700-1900°k but if you look at the spectrum diagram the red peak is nearly in a perfect range.
    Here is a thread somewhere we have discussed about this diodes, maybe, when I find it again, I'll let you know. I could swear I have seen them on sol-skin boards as additionals and the discussion was in one of the CRI90 threads...
    But in short, the spectrum is similar to the vero meat chips only in a small smd3014 footprint.
     

    Attached Files:

    PSUAGRO. and Prawn Connery like this.
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    Prawn Connery

    Prawn Connery Well-Known Member

    I'm new to all this, but taking one look at that spec sheet has me asking: why aren't more people using these types of LEDs for flowering, and/or as a supplement for blue (450nm) and deep red (650nm)?

    "Well, because it only produces 86 lumens per watt!" I can hear people saying.

    But see, this is the thing I don't quite follow . . . So much emphasis seems to be placed on luminous flux - lumens per watt - in terms off LED efficiency, and not radiant flux - which is arguably a far more accurate measure of how a chip or diode may perform in terms of flower or veg power.

    The simple fact luminous flux is weighted around the green spectra where the human eye is most sensitive - and where photosynthesis is arguably least reliant (for flowering purposes at least) - means a "super efficient" LED in terms of LPW that puts out a significant amount of its radiant energy in the 500-600nm wavelengths may not be all that efficient at all when it comes to horticulture.

    I know luminous flux is all we have to measure one diode against another on factory data sheets - and I am not ignoring the importance of the green spectra for complete photosynthetic efficiency and light penetration; nor the fact total radiant energy in all usable wavelengths is a greater driver of photosynthetic performance than spectrum alone - but I see a case for perhaps moving somewhat away from all this emphasis on lumens per watt towards desired spectra.

    I don't know how else to measure the efficiency of that "fresh meat" diode, but it seems to me to have the basis for a very good flowering lamp.
     
    ganjamystic, Dave455 and Randomblame like this.
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    Prawn Connery

    Prawn Connery Well-Known Member

    I wish I could wait, but I've put this off long enough. I have a long indoor growing history, but due to recent work/life commitments, I have just started my first grow in almost three years. It took a while to school myself to the point where I was confident enough to take the plunge into LEDs, and now that I've built my first veg frame using 5000K F Series strips, I need to build or buy myself a flowering lamp in the next two weeks, as I will need to start flowering then.

    I could conceivably borrow a 600w HPS lamp to get me by, but that kinda defeats the purpose of going LED. And lets face it, new technology is coming out every day - I could wait for another 10 years for the next Big Thing - but you have to commit some time. So end of next week is really my cut-off limit in terms of decision time.
     
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    CobKits

    CobKits Well-Known Member Rollitup Advertiser

    hard to go wrong with strips and such. even if it doesnt work out for growing they make great shoplights etc
     
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    wietefras

    wietefras Well-Known Member

    Heh, so, no one actually says that, but you have a whole rant about it anyway? :cool:

    For comparing 3000K COBs/SMDs, lumen gives a decent indication of efficacy.

    For more "exotic" SPDs, Alesh made an Excel sheet that lets you calculate the LER and QER from a spectral power distribution chart. Allowing those lumen values to be converted into PAR values (either 400-700 or wider).
     

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