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ShLUbY's Garden

Discussion in 'Organics' started by ShLUbY, Oct 26, 2015.

  1.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

  2.  
    DonTesla

    DonTesla Well-Known Member

    55 degrees Celsius for 3 days, I had to watch it! :D. Happy Mothers Day ALL! Nice Work on that column, Shlu!
     
    Mohican, ShLUbY and calliandra like this.
  3.  
    calliandra

    calliandra Well-Known Member

    DonTesla likes this.
  4.  
    DonTesla

    DonTesla Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the link Calli, very solid!
     
    calliandra likes this.
  5.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    this looks really similar to what she has posted on soilfoodweb.com ! Thanks. My lack of high N material proved to be fatal, and the thermal process did not last more than 10-11 days. I also think I did not have the pile moistened through properly and I think that would have helped the material break down faster in those first couple weeks. That being said.... I'm still hopeful that I'll have some compost ready to go in about 30 days or so. just gonna make sure it stays moist, and turn that sucker once or twice a week. I need it... just put the garden in. they'll make it for now, but I need some compost and I don't want to go and buy any lol. I hate buying stuff I can make, but if it's looking like it's not gonna happen, I'll go and pick some up.

    I have some shots and plans for the veggie garden along with grow shots too. Just been too busy!

    @calliandra sorry to see you lost the battle with the cherry tree... but you can still and will improve the health of the soil and the tree, over time. Looking forward to seeing your garden over the course of the season :) I gambled and put a bunch of stuff in the ground before June... forecast looks good :bigjoint:

    I need to work on plans for some cold frames so I can do some early/late season cruciferous veggies, beets, and other hardy greens. Nothing like maximizing the growing season. I have been having issues with my beets not getting very much size to them... the golden ones especially. I also have a rust/fungus that I get on my beet greens, and swiss chard that i'd like to try and fix this year. hopefully some good compost and teas will help me out with it.
     
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  6.  
    natureboygrower

    natureboygrower Well-Known Member

    hey @ShLUbY sorry to step on your thread,but i had a question if you or anyone could help out.i have access to lobster bodies starting tomorrow and will all summer.tomorrow there will be 75 bodies along with the husks of 90 ears of corn. i have a yard of bought compost as well.i have a sunny spot but live in the woods.raccoons,porcupines,foxes all that.can i mix the lobster bodies with some compost and husks and be off and running?i'm thinking no way is it going to be that easy.i suppose i'll just fence it in to keep the critters out.
     
  7.  
    calliandra

    calliandra Well-Known Member

    Ah, there's nothing like failure to really learn stuff, just have to get over my pride lol
    Remembering Donkey saying "ah, pride has nothing to do with it" somewhere in the Shrek films, makes that easy :bigjoint:
    So having had a compost collapse on me last autumn, I can relate to what happened with yours, based on your analysis, and re-confirming what happened in mine too :cool:

    Ah yes, our bad that you're so busy of late :mrgreen:
    Coldframes are great indeed! So easy to build and such immense advantages in colder regions!

    I'm going to put eggplants in mine this year (leaving it open, but still with the lid on as roof to get a good warm climate there).
    Letting the lamb's lettuce and the winter cress seed out in there first at the mo, works like a charm for having them in there again next winter!
    It's really interesting to observe how stuff that is offspring from former plants growing there is much less susceptible to getting munched on than stuff grown from new seeds or baby plants brought in, so of course I prefer them all to do the propagation themselves (also, I suck at propagation :rolleyes:)

    Cheers!
     
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  8.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    OKAY, the morel craze has long been over, I've been working on a summer online class for school, getting the garden ready for the season, and everything else in between! Sorry for the long absense for those of you following closely :) I made myself make some time today for photos and a post!

    We'll start off in the cannabis garden...

    The newest run of Con Cheese just hit the flower room and is looking good right off the rip. I cleaned them up a lot the day before I put them in there because they were really bushy with too many sites last time for the soil that they were in and I didn't want a repeat... so I cleaned out the bottoms.... ALOT lol. I hope they grow well and produce more compact/dense larger nugs than a bunch of smaller stuff like my last run cause I wanted to see how they'd do (I don't think the soil recipe was fixed for that last run which lead to the smaller buds IMO).

    ConCheese.jpg

    Here is the latest run of brainwreck to hit the flower room and are about 30 days in.... I think I've finally dialed in my soil recipe and a couple topdressing techniques. These are hands down the best two looking plants of the year. There are SOOOOOO many bud sites, and the node spacing is very compact. These should be my best two yielding plants of the year so far and I'm hoping for repeat successes from here on out.

    Wrecks30Days.jpg WreckDay30.jpg Wreck30Day.jpg

    These are my first two no-tills, 20 gal each. So for now... they are just a product of the initial soil mix. I'm looking forward to trying to do the no till thing. I'm going to build two more, and run 4 of them on one light before I go full scale. I also think I'm going to get 25 or 30 gals next. I even thought about getting a separate tent for 4 of them and veg/flower in the same tent so I never have to move them). For now, they are on 4 wheel dollies so i can roll them around as I need and not compact the soil from relocating back and forth. The soil in them is my current up to date recipe, which I will post in this thread soon. I didn't do any topdressing with this round because I figured 20 gal was enough to get them from start to finish, But as soon as I harvest them in a week I'll be topdressing compost and amendments and putting new plants in them.

    NoTillWreck.jpg WreckNoTill.jpg WreckCola.jpg

    And last, here is the first run of the Dairy Queen, just a single,small tester plant to see what to do with it. Been awhile since I've had it.

    Dairy.jpg DQ.jpg
     
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  9.  
    calliandra

    calliandra Well-Known Member

    Maaan those brainwrecks are looking as happy as DonBrennon plants! :mrgreen:
    very much congrats on your soil quality!!!!!
     
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  10.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    thanks!!! that's a hell of a compliment! and to boot.... those are in 5 gallon plastics.... :o:o:o:o
     
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  11.  
    calliandra

    calliandra Well-Known Member

    Oh amazing! Hey wait,. are these from your pots experiment?! how did that end - just tell me to go back if I've somehow missed a post on that ;)
    Cheers! :bigjoint:
     
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  12.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    Here's some shots of the outdoor garden in its infancy... can't wait to see it in a couple months!

    NoTill.jpg
    orange cherry tomato with some other cover plants spinach, dill, coriander

    GreensPeasZuch.jpg
    green snap peas, zucchini, lettuce, coriander, and other greens when i get them planted

    WhiteWonder2.jpg WhiteWonder.jpg
    these little white wonder strawberries are awesome, small.... but awesome!

    Peppers.jpg
    jalapeno, white bells, giant green bells, early reds, cherry bomb and one other multicolor i can't remember.

    SquashMelonCuc.jpg
    minnesota midget melons, pie pumpkin, boston pickle cucumbers, round melons, spaghetti squash, and butternut squash. will be training the majority of them up the trellis/fencing. I also just moved all my potted herbs (rosemary, basil, parsley, spearmint and apple mint, pineapple sage, and one or two others) inbetween the cucurbit plants to try and mask the pheromones they put off that attract vine borer beetles. i hear essential oils of these plants watered into the soil are great for repelling them. I'll be trying that next.

    WaterMelon.jpg
    crimson and sugar baby watermelons. they're just gonna vine out all over the place :) 79 and 81 day watermelons. I learned this year that they are high nitrogen feeders... never knew that! hoping for my best watermelon season ever!

    Tomatoes.jpg
    early red beets, pink henderson; 4th of july (red and yellow) jumbos; san marzano (best sauce tomato ever and very good yielder), and my poor green zebra which never really did anything :( no clue why! Green zebra is one of my favorite tomatoes to eat fresh/raw. bummer....

    Beans.jpg

    and last but not least, the green/yellow/purple bush beans!
     
  13.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    unfortunately the results couldn't be recorded. i was away at school for the week when they went into the jars and they all got mixed together so i never could get an idea of what really happened lol. it's ok, my soil recipe is better and more dialed in now, so i will be repeating the experiment again very soon. Oh well! overall, the light as a whole averaged what i was getting when they were all in the same size container, which is not surprising :)
     
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  14.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    also the compost pile still is not finished.... i didn't have enough high N when i started the pile... also.... i will be mixing all the materials together rather than doing the layers thing. it just makes a shit ton more sense to me to mix it all... maximizes the reaction for thermal processes... no brainer!

    the next recipe i will try is going to be 5 parts high C, 4 parts low N, and 2 parts Coffee grounds. mix it all up, inoculate, and pray!
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017
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  15.  
    calliandra

    calliandra Well-Known Member

    Are you going to innoculate with compost tea?! :D
     
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  16.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    yup compost tea, and i'm gonna go get some old growth soil samples and inoculate with those as well. should be fun :) not sure when exactly i'll get around to it.
     
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  17.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    question though... would I want to inoculate with the old growth forest humus after the thermal processes have happened??? seems to make the most sense to me since they are not used to being exposed to 160deg. temps.....
     
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  18.  
    calliandra

    calliandra Well-Known Member

    yeah, my first impulse would be to agree too :D

    In her last compost webinar, Ingham discussed this though -- and if I remember correctly (it was middle of the night for me), she was pointing out the possibility of the innoculum containing disease-causing fungi - any others of which we just got rid of by heating up that pile with so much care. So we could be tainting our beautiful microbiology while intending to achieve the opposite. Too bad they haven't uploaded the recorded version yet, then I could check on that!!

    So that would speak for innoculating before the thermal process, which is usually the case too if you've had the time to get that woodchip pile innoculating for a while. And they don't get killed by the temps normally, if they have enough time to go dormant (again and exasperatingly, depending on the right amount of hi N, not too much, not too little, haha)

    But that's the thing, in those wood chips, the fungi have (best case) colonized a nice part of the materials so they'll be present throughout the pile, whereas if you're adding in the teaspoon straight from the woods, I'd also tend to think it would just get lost in that big mass of materials.

    Soooo, not sure? :shock:
     
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  19.  
    calliandra

    calliandra Well-Known Member

    Ooo that's bound to be really interesting! Apparently, the pile goes hot much faster that way :blsmoke:
     
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  20.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    Happy Holidays everyone, and Merry New Year. Hope 2018 brings joy and success to all! I've been super busy with school this past year, and only being home on the weekends leaves me little time to do anything else! Been working hard to keep up with life. Anyway, cheers. I'll try and get some shots up of what's going on here before I go back for the new semester.

    Here's some shots of the latest run of Gorilla Glue!

    GG4Frost.jpg GG4Close.jpg GG4Cage.jpg GG4.jpg

    :peace::peace::peace::peace::peace::peace::peace::peace::peace::peace::peace::peace::peace::peace:
     
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