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What are your essential nutrients and supplements for your plants?

Discussion in 'Advanced Marijuana Cultivation' started by Ivan___, Nov 4, 2017.

  1.  
    Dr. Who

    Dr. Who Well-Known Member

    I've never really been a fan of Si use in soils.
    It did some things for me in hydro but, nothing like what the makers can claim for their high priced products......I mean, tell people it will do XY&Z and by god they'll "see" almost exactly what makers "claim" in the first run with it....It's mostly confirmation bias at that point.

    In Coco? Are you having problems that would be helped by it's use? Go with your answer to that question.... See what I mean.
     
    since1991, budman111 and Flowki like this.
  2.  
    Flowki

    Flowki Well-Known Member

    Guess that answers it, figured I lacked perspective to make that conclusion. Anyway, basalt is something that interests me regardless. Can a meaningful amount be used and prepped in a worm bin?.
     
    since1991 and Dr. Who like this.
  3.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    I think that's the small bale, not the 3.8 cu ft.
     
    since1991 likes this.
  4.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    I've grown with & without silica and found that they are stronger and healthier with it than without it. Also more resistant to pests and mold/PM.
    Admittedly, I've never ran a side-by-side but I've grown a few rounds of clones from the same mother plant and definitely noticed a difference.
    The silica I like is Dyna-Gro Protekt and it was cheap. Quarts are ~$10 and gallons are $30.
    Not bad because I only use 1/2 tsp per gallon. :hump:
    It also works well as a PH-up. I use a couple of bottled nutes that have a very low PH. (Most fish & seaweed liquid ferts are low PH.)
    Wish I could find a local source of rice hulls. Good for soil tilth + lots of silica. 8)
     
    since1991, ruwtz and jarvild like this.
  5.  
    Roger A. Shrubber

    Roger A. Shrubber Well-Known Member

    ah, you're right, that is the 2.2, the 3.8 is 36 bucks
     
    chemphlegm and Chunky Stool like this.
  6.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    None of the home depots around here carry the big one -- and all they have is BX, which holds a lot of water. Perlite is cheap and it's always easy to mix it in, but mixing can be a pain on a large scale.
    I always liked promix HP because I can use it straight of the bag(block) and get consistent results.
     
    since1991 likes this.
  7.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    Stability is irrelevant and is a usually misused term in the cannabis community. Most people use the term "stable genetics" to describe whether or not a plant has a tendency to turn herm. A stable strain is one that will produce very consistently similar plants and product from regular seed. That is also the proper definition of strain so to say stable strain is redundant.

    Environment and genetics are almost equally important. The deciding factor is that a plant can't outperform its genetic potential no matter how well dialed in the environment is.

    As far as nutrients go there's the ratios of macros and micros and then it gets deep with the different dynamics of the rhyzosphere, or root zone environment. Ph, ec, moisture to air ratio, cation exchange capacity, and all of the incredible things that soil organisms do, big and small, are really important to understand and quite a bit more than can be really efficiently discussed here.
     
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  8.  
    Dr. Who

    Dr. Who Well-Known Member

    :clap::clap::clap:
     
    since1991 likes this.
  9.  
    Dr. Who

    Dr. Who Well-Known Member

    Often called "ROCK DUST".....I've simply mixed it in my soil's. I'm not exactly sure but, the idea of including it in worm bin's is interesting..

    Try it, and let us all know about how that went!

    Not expecting an answer to that for 6 months - :mrgreen:
     
    since1991 and Flowki like this.
  10.  
    Flowki

    Flowki Well-Known Member

    Maybe sooner if the worms all die ;p.
     
  11.  
    Tyleb173rd

    Tyleb173rd Well-Known Member

    Quality compost (my EWC) is my essential ingredient.
     
    since1991, Dr. Who and Chunky Stool like this.
  12.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    What do you feed them?
    I only give my worms kitchen scraps, and the castings are HOT.
    It's not really a problem now that I know what's going on -- but it was a surprise at first! :shock: :o
     
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  13.  
    Tyleb173rd

    Tyleb173rd Well-Known Member

    I inoculate new beds with a scoop of the oldest and most composted castings. We are a family of five so we have enough food trim for multiple worm bins. They get mostly veggie trim like broccoli stems and cauliflower stalks. They also get egg shells and banana peels. All of the food trim is cut into smaller pieces and then frozen. Once frozen I put the pi3ces in my Vita Prep blender and purée. I then add the egg shells and banana peel and I pulse it until well blended.

    I prepare beds ahead of time with layered coco, perlite, shredded paper and dried stems. When it’s time to feed I layer more bedding but in between each layer I pour a little worm food smoothie. Within hours they are smashing the smoothie. Hundreds of worms just ball up around it. It’s awesome.
     
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  14.  
    since1991

    since1991 Well-Known Member

    Indoor envoronments...especially indoors...are consistent enough where cultivars will not vary that much. You will get subtle (relatively speaking) differences but the jist of the cultivar is fairly consistent from grow room to grow room...no matter the location on the map. Now YOU WILL get maybe a little more than subtle nuances what with all the different lighting nowadays but cultivars (passed around clone varieties) will still be ball park. Where you will get radical differences is outdoor in vastly different climates...over time..especially seeds of the same cultivar and Ive even seen it with clones...over time. Not in one season but them fuckers will adapt eventually. I have an uncle up northern Michigan way that has been growing the same Colombian and Mexican sativas since the late 1970's. He doesn't root cuts that much. But sure does save males and throws pollen indoors for seed and next seasons crop...and a few years back I swore they were different plants from when i was a kid. WAY more indica looking now. Way earlier chop times. And these were really satty 70's plants.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2017
  15.  
    since1991

    since1991 Well-Known Member

    Or how about "jersey green sand" ???
     
  16.  
    ruwtz

    ruwtz Well-Known Member

    I run potassium silicate in coco drip dtw and wouldn't work without it. First thing I add to RO res, then fix the pH spike before adding everything else. I run it all the way to mid bloom and stems are visibly thicker and stronger, and particularly useful if monster cropping. Doesn't seem necessary after week 4 or 5 as plant isn't growing anymore, but nevertheless will appreciate the K which I think folks underestimate in favor of P.

    Make a stock solution instead of adding dry salt and no issue of binding (use hot water for stock as the silica isn't too soluble otherwise). I have ratios if you're interested.
     
    Dr. Who, Chunky Stool and since1991 like this.
  17.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    Wow, that's a lot more trouble than I go through. I mix fresh scraps with some older castings to jump start microbial activity plus shredded paper & oyster shell (to keep PH down), and a little sand for grit. They get to chew it for a long time...
     
    Tyleb173rd likes this.
  18.  
    since1991

    since1991 Well-Known Member

    Joe Schmoe...right the fuk on bro!!!
     
  19.  
    Tyleb173rd

    Tyleb173rd Well-Known Member

    It’s no trouble. There’s a trim bin in the freezer that I thaw once a week.
     
    Chunky Stool likes this.
  20.  
    Dr. Who

    Dr. Who Well-Known Member

    Green Sand is best used by those who re-use/re-amend soils. Green Sand is mighty slow release. It's not doing much at all that first run, and doesn't need to be re-amended for around a year+...
    The No -Till organic guys are the perfect end user of this product....

    I add it to only one soil I mix for bloom, and don't re-amend that (Green Sand) for like 18 months. Even then I'm only adding back 2/3 of what I first used. That works for "me."

    Rock dust's are slow release and re-emend at about the exact same rates.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
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