1. We are currently experiencing issues with viewing and uploading images, our team is working on the issue.
    Dismiss Notice

Yeah! It's Bud Worm Season. Pics

Discussion in 'Outdoor Growing' started by CrazyChester, Sep 11, 2008.

  1.  
    jbcCT

    jbcCT Active Member

    P
    Yeah mother nature will force our hand from time to time. No rot, these were tiny, almost like an inch worm. I didn't let them get big maybe. what's good protection from worms?
     
  2.  
    sandhill larry

    sandhill larry Well-Known Member

    If there is any worm shit in the buds, you may get rot on down the road.

    Google BT. That is what most folks use in one form or the other for their IPM.
     
  3.  
    Sir Napsalot

    Sir Napsalot Well-Known Member

    Mosquito netting enclosure
    bug zapper
     
    Fender Super likes this.
  4.  
    jbcCT

    jbcCT Active Member

    The afflicted areas we're small enough to cut out, taking the little black worm shit with it. Took forever to trim as I went over it with magnifying glass, wanted the cleanest product possible. Most plants were worm free.

    I ran 100%Afghan and these suckers were not only resilient against pests, they were most happy in 90-95 degree summer sun and they liked it on the dry side water wise.
     
    sandhill larry likes this.
  5.  
    TheHempberg369

    TheHempberg369 Member

    Sorry to hear about the worms, you got a pretty looking lady.:clap:
     
  6.  
    dano88

    dano88 Member

    Never heard of that only snailsand they like smaller juicer plants I find.
     
  7.  
    vino4russ

    vino4russ Well-Known Member

    Thanks Potroast, I know this was a longtime ago post but it works great. Great advise
     
  8.  
    BushMaster15

    BushMaster15 Well-Known Member

    I always had problems with slugs. I fucking hate those things!
     
    CaliSmokes likes this.
  9.  
    Mysticalgrower94

    Mysticalgrower94 Active Member

    What is b
    What is BT? New on these things, sorry.
     
  10.  
    37Caligrown

    37Caligrown New Member

    Cut the dead or damaged part out
    If it's to bad cut the whole bud off if u have them its hard to just be rid of them ,but manage them til u harvest
     
  11.  
    Fender Super

    Fender Super Well-Known Member

    When you say 'prepared,' can you please define that more, in the context of your own grow? Will a greenhouse do anything to keep them away?
     
  12.  
    Purpnugz

    Purpnugz Well-Known Member

    No pest strips :cuss:

    IMG_0935.PNG IMG_0937.PNG IMG_0930.PNG
     
  13.  
    Jaybodankly

    Jaybodankly Well-Known Member

  14.  
    chemphlegm

    chemphlegm Well-Known Member

    Bt is what monsanto makes corn produce within its genome. GMO foods allow us to eat Bt.
    Since 80% of your immune system is located in your gut, the last thing you want to do is eat gut-destroying Bt toxins

    Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) is a gram-positive soil-dwelling bacterium that has been used as an insecticide since the 1920s. When farmers spray their crops with this bacterium or its insecticidal proteins or spores, insects eat it and they die when their intestines explode. When this pesticide is just sprayed on your food, you are able to wash it off. Indeed, the spraying of it on crops, even organic crops, allows it to be washed off. Sunshine also quickly degrades it. When used in this way it is considered effective against pests and harmless to humans, as it is not absorbed into the plant.

    Mice fed natural Bt-toxin showed significant immune responses and caused them to become sensitive to other formerly harmless compounds. This suggests that Bt-toxin might make a person allergic to a wide range of substances. (1, 2, 3) Farm workers and others have also had reactions to natural Bt-toxin, (4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ) and authorities acknowledge that “People with compromised immune systems or preexisting allergies may be particularly susceptible to the effects of Bt.” (9) In fact, when natural Bt was sprayed over areas around Vancouver and Washington State to fight gypsy moths, about 500 people reported reactions—mostly allergy or flu-like symptoms. Six people had to go to the emergency room.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mercola/bt-corn_b_2442072.html
     
  15.  
    chemphlegm

    chemphlegm Well-Known Member

    Jaybodankly likes this.
  16.  
    Purpnugz

    Purpnugz Well-Known Member

    4x Twisted sister
    IMG_0970.JPG IMG_0971.JPG
    :lol:
    IMG_0980.PNG IMG_0967.JPG IMG_0968.JPG IMG_0972.JPG IMG_0973.JPG IMG_0963.JPG IMG_0964.JPG
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
  17.  
    Purpnugz

    Purpnugz Well-Known Member

    Iiberty haze
    IMG_0961.JPG
    IMG_0962.JPG
    LSD
    IMG_0974.JPG
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
    SnakierGrizzly likes this.
  18.  
    Joey McBuds

    Joey McBuds New Member

    Clearly that one crawled over your head lol
     
  19.  
    SnakierGrizzly

    SnakierGrizzly Well-Known Member

  20.  
    Lord Kanti

    Lord Kanti Well-Known Member

    I really hate that It's come to this, but I don't think I can pick out all the caterpillars by hand this season. They can be so annoying, but they grow up to be pollinators and are crucial for our environment, also they are rather cute and friendly when they're bumbling around in your palm and not eating your crops. I know that the large spooky horned ones grow up to be the beautiful sphinx / hummingbird moth. If I can see any, I will grab them and put them in the flower garden, but as of tonight I will be experimenting with an unconventional bacterial control agent. I'll try to post results, but harvest is still quite a way off, so no promises as of yet. :-|

    Protip: DO NOT REMOVE THE PAPER WASPS FROM AROUND YOUR HOME. Paper wasps prey upon caterpillars. If they are too close for comfort and they are attacking you, then you must do what you've got to do, but not many people realize that paper wasps are beneficial predatory insects. I have a ton that I was going to remove, but now I will not, as they are not bothering anyone, even though they scary to some visitors.
     

Share This Page