Worms

Discussion in 'Organics' started by freemanjack, Nov 6, 2016.

  1.  
    freemanjack

    freemanjack Well-Known Member

    I might have missed it, if so my apologies for any duplication but I see a lot of talk about worm castings as food, wormeries and how good these things are. Anybody else actually add live worms to their grows?? If I pull up a root-ball and its not got a worm wrigglin in it, I figure I bin doin summat wrong. Red Wriggler compost worms are cool but often fragile and choosy where they like to live, so I have been capturing wild earthworms and adding these too now I am happy most will survive. Earthworms will drag whole leaves underground and are quite incredible soil creation machines, dirt, dust and plant fibres go in one end, perfect ph balanced living soil comes out the back! Love your worms.
    nuff sed.
     
  2.  
    iHearAll

    iHearAll Well-Known Member

    yep. it's nice to see them in solo cup.
     
  3.  
    greasemonkeymann

    greasemonkeymann Well-Known Member

    that picture makes my head feel hurty...
     
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  4.  
    iHearAll

    iHearAll Well-Known Member

    yea its pretty gross and i dont do it on purpose. but more often than not, while transplanting, i find large worms have settled in the bottom of my cups..

    or the dog being carcassized?
     
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  5.  
    greasemonkeymann

    greasemonkeymann Well-Known Member

    nah, the pic man...
    i'm confused..
    is it from a movie or what??
    or did you just google "alien attacking dog with flamethrower while owner watches in agony"?
     
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  6.  
    freemanjack

    freemanjack Well-Known Member

    So that's the extent of this forums attention to the SINGLE MOST VITAL invertebrate ON THE FUCKIN PLANET??? How many of you's are on the less than legal side of growin and havin to dispose of masses of cabbage, root ball and schwag, each of which, if caught in possession will get yer door kicked in. Worms on the other hand, will eat the lot, make food fer yer girls, AND they chuff out a stack of co2 to boot. WORMS = WINNING!!!
     
  7.  
    greasemonkeymann

    greasemonkeymann Well-Known Member

    preaching to the choir man most of us have wormbins
     
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  8.  
    freemanjack

    freemanjack Well-Known Member

    Yeah but this goes way beyond that, how many with wormeries actively include those worms into their growing medium to aid soil creation, remove old root fibres and to 'self fertilise' your girls? that was the op question, and I don't mean happening to see the odd worm in an organic grow.
     
  9.  
    greasemonkeymann

    greasemonkeymann Well-Known Member

    I think most of us utilize worms in our soils as well, the whole concept of organics is to as closely replicate nature as possible, hence the desire for compost based mixes, worms and their castings
    and you are the OP... speaking in the third person?
    plus all that is totally useless without plant electrolytes
    brawdo.jpg
     
  10.  
    freemanjack

    freemanjack Well-Known Member

    Glad to hear it and it was my question (op as in original post not original poster) not meaning to 'teach me grannie to suck eggs' here, was just looking to see who was on the same page. I've been hammering away at electro-biology for nearly 5 years now and got zero traction among serious academics, is really encouraging to find some other researchers looking into the real source of plant biology. (google 'freemanjack electro-biology' an you will find some of my work to date on the subject) Have you tried using a multi-meter to measure your results? If not then try milivolt dc range with the positive probe in yer soil medium an the other in the stem of the plant, i've seen numbers as high as 800mv after a soak with a good tea, 250mv most other times.
     
  11.  
    iHearAll

    iHearAll Well-Known Member

    Mars attacks. it was a movie in the 90's where mars attacks. bongsmilie

    umm it had jack nickelson in it. the aliens beheaded a woman and place her head on a dog. there was an white kid who found out that loud music would make the aliens heads explode. green goo shot everywhere. day was saved.

    i do fermentation with bokashi in 5 gallon pails to dispose of plants. but i also eat the entire plant on occassion because im a psycho. i feed the fermented plant to the worms. smells like sauerkraut. i have stems and branches that i just let dry and break up then add to the fermented bokashi pail deal.

    also i got a .5V reading between my soil base and mid branch. but that was a while ago. idk about today. the voltage diminishes towards the branch tip and leaves but is constant on the main stem. peculiar. i would imagine the stem to show some resistance but then again if the diameter is big enough is would be the lowest resistance in the entire plant circuit. so the DMM wouldnt register the difference between 2 inches from the soil line an 8 inches from the soil line as long as it's the main.
     
  12.  
    freemanjack

    freemanjack Well-Known Member


    Dood there associating field strength with angle of internodals, the positivity at each growin tip repels it from every other tip, creating the perfect 'iron filings on a magnet' pattern clearly indicating the electromagnetic route of plant biology. Now try figure where the volts come from!
     
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  13.  
    iHearAll

    iHearAll Well-Known Member

    i was thinking the plant as an ion harvester but it really looks like an un-evolved nervous system. bout to watch the video lecture im just sharing my ignorant thoughts first
     
  14.  
    freemanjack

    freemanjack Well-Known Member

    Free standing plasma is how I prefer to visualise it, frozen lightning if you prefer, and certainly it would appear the plant utilises planetary atmospheric ion flow but I suspect micro-biology is responsible for the standing dc voltage/current, or at very least is the medium through which that voltage is transmitted. I believe it is this circuit that is what NPK's poorly replicate in inorganic grows. Again it may be the worm's place to distribute the biology responsible for the maintenance of this circuit, In soil terms worms are a top tier in the soil food web and are little bio-reactors.
    Ever tried simply feeding your worms the cabbage and stalk without brewing? Mine here get thru everything in about 6 weeks, including stalks and rootball.
     
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  15.  
    iHearAll

    iHearAll Well-Known Member

    yes but i dont grow all that much. i maintain a modest vegetable garden so the worm bin is only about 7 gallons into two tiers. DIY worm tower for the time being. im in education so i tend to move around. the gardens mobile.

    so you're saying the plant IS frozen plasma? or just resembles the shape? or builds itself on it as the plasma passes through time?
     
  16.  
    freemanjack

    freemanjack Well-Known Member

    I feel like i've come in from the cold!! precisely, the plant as we perceive it, is the atoms that have been electrostatically drawn out of the soil (or into by an opposite charge in the case of roots). This is why plants and lightening resemble each other morphologically, one is a transient burst of high voltage discharge, the other more like a 'standing wave' in sea of ions.
     
  17.  
    greasemonkeymann

    greasemonkeymann Well-Known Member

    no I haven't actually.
    But I definitely know my way around a DVOM, it's one of my main diagnostic tools.
    You can play around with those a lot, reading current from allll sorts of things, people, plants, etc.
    interesting shit
    Electricity is everywhere, people just don't realize it because it's invisible (most of the time)
     
  18.  
    iHearAll

    iHearAll Well-Known Member

    yea like Kirchhoff's junction law in slow mo.

    i imagine there would be capacitance between the each root fiber, between each branch, between the branches to the roots. if there were any inductance in roots (maybe) then there would be this vibration or pulse from self oscillation (RLC). it's a complex picture, that's for sure.
     
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  19.  
    BurnzAU

    BurnzAU Member


    Fuckin gold. Idiocracy.
     
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  20.  
    platt

    platt Well-Known Member

    Why not dropping an hyperboloid into the toroid you two are envisioning?
    [​IMG]
    Lets say thats the suberized part of your plant.
    Then you paint a couple semiespheres to accomplish the picture of both apical merystems. Then the sun.

    what do you think
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2016
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