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Pure Chlorophyll For Enriching Organic Compost or Soil with Nitrogen + Magnesium

Discussion in 'Organics' started by cannetix Inc, Nov 4, 2017.

  1.  
    cannetix Inc

    cannetix Inc Well-Known Member

    Chlorophyll For Enriching Organic Compost & Soil With Nitrogen + Magnesium

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    The above image is a molecule of Chlorophyll a, which will be the focus of this argument due to its universal occurrence in higher plants as well as single-celled algae. As you can easily see from its structure, as well as its molecular formula (C55H72O5N4Mg), while like most organic molecules, chlorophyll a consists mainly of Hydrogen and Carbon, it also contains a Magnesium ion encased in a large ring structure known as a Chlorin, which contains 4 Nitrogen atoms. Under normal circumstances, the Chlorophyll content of plants provides little in terms of Nitrogen and Magnesium in compost. This is because plants actually contain relatively small concentrations of this molecule, rarely exceeding 1 milligram of Chlorophyll per gram of raw plant material, and because the Total Nitrogen/Magnesium content of Chlorophyll is low, with the bulk of the mass of the molecules resulting from Carbon & Hydrogen atoms.

    Chlorophyll is, however, widely available in concentrated form, commonly sold for its claimed health benefits. Regardless of the accuracy/legitimacy of these claims in regards to human health, concentrated chlorophyll is a valuable product for enriching organic composts with Nitrogen and Magnesium, two abundant plant nutrients which are found in relatively low levels in traditional composts. Although the microbial decomposition and biodegradation of Chlorophyll are, surprisingly, not widely understood, its lack of persistence in the environment means it certainly does undergo rapid decomposition by one or more of the micro-organisms found in soil systems.


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    In its pure form, Chlorophyll is approximately 6.27% Nitrogen (by weight) and 2.72% Magnesium (by weight). In fertilizer values, N, P and K numbers represent the percentage of the corresponding element by weight (molar mass). This gives pure Chlorophyll an NPK value of approximately 6-0-0, making it an excellent source of 'slow-release' organic Nitrogen and Magnesium as well as, like any other organic molecule, an excellent source of organic matter/Carbon for soil.

    Whether or not there are any benefits to using Chlorophyll in this manner vs. an alternative product is still up for debate, however, Chlorophyll does have certain properties that give it some degree of potential value over alternatives such as Gelatin. Gelatin, which is one of the more common sources of Nitrogen used in organic gardening, is an animal by-product and therefore not suitable for "veganic" growers, which may be one potential application of Chlorophyll. Another interesting property of Chlorophyll is its Ratio of Nitrogen to Magnesium, which for obvious reasons are present at a ratio that is close to optimal when considering the main biological role of these elements in plants - Chlorophyll biosynthesis.


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    https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-007-1579-0_3 Chlorophyll Biosynthesis in Higher Plants
    https://www.intechopen.com/books/bi...d-special-products/chlorophyll-biodegradation Chlorophyll Biodegradation
    http://www.mbl.edu/microbialdiversity/files/2012/08/mdiv2010Jaekel.pdf Microbial Biodegradation of Chlorophyll
    https://www.britannica.com/science/chlorophyll Chlorophyll
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4613352/ Critical Issues in the Study of Magnesium Transport Systems and Magnesium Deficiency Symptoms in Plant
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2887065/ Nitrogen Uptake, Assimilation, and Remobilization in plants



     
    cindysid likes this.
  2.  
    Rasta Roy

    Rasta Roy Well-Known Member

    In the ultimate growing scam, someone has started bottling chlorophyll for you to give to your plants.

    It's something your plants produce themselves...but hey....fuck it right?!
     
    swedsteven likes this.
  3.  
    Rasta Roy

    Rasta Roy Well-Known Member

    On a side note...

    Chlorophyll????

    More like borophyll!
     
    giglewigle likes this.
  4.  
    Rasta Roy

    Rasta Roy Well-Known Member

    This is cracking me up so much right now.
     
    Tyleb173rd likes this.
  5.  
    Gumdrawp

    Gumdrawp Well-Known Member

    I don't think I've ever had a hard time getting enough N or Mg. I don't see why I'd need more in my compost...
     
    BionicΩChronic and Rasta Roy like this.
  6.  
    BionicΩChronic

    BionicΩChronic Well-Known Member

    Interesting thread and a good read but I'm like that the last guy. Nitrogen seems like the easiest thing to get to your plant. My opinion tho is that if it works for you then shit run a side by side
     
  7.  
    vostok

    vostok Well-Known Member

    once harvested cure your weed

    via the wet cure method

    you have all the chlorophyll soup you want

    good luck
     
    Rasta Roy likes this.
  8.  
    cindysid

    cindysid Well-Known Member

    I'm thinking of doing a foliar feeding with it, just for shits and giggles. When I buy or concoct some, I'll let you know what I think. I'm not afraid to try it.
     
  9.  
    BionicΩChronic

    BionicΩChronic Well-Known Member

    @vostok Is your profile pic from battlefield bad company? I've always assumed it was
     
  10.  
    vostok

    vostok Well-Known Member

    BionicΩChronic and cindysid like this.
  11.  
    waterproof808

    waterproof808 Well-Known Member

    I've never heard of any grower using gelatin as a nitrogen source ever. What a load a shit. Free chlorophyll is all around you.
     
  12.  
    cindysid

    cindysid Well-Known Member

    Gelatin has been used as an organic source of nitrogen for many years. It is unlikely to burn your plants. Do some research, then you too will know about it. Don't dismiss something just because you haven't heard of it. You'll miss out on valuable knowledge.
     
  13.  
    waterproof808

    waterproof808 Well-Known Member

    I was just dismissing the buying of chlorophyll as a "compost enricher" when you can get it free. I suppose I should've formatted my post better. Lots of organic N sources that are cheaper than gelatin and not a byproduct of the livestock industry.
     
    cindysid likes this.
  14.  
    vostok

    vostok Well-Known Member

    How much nitrogen is present in unflavored gelatin?
    Type A gelatin (dry and ash free) contains 18.5 % nitrogen,
    but due to the loss of amide groups, Type B gelatin contains only about 18 % nitrogen (7).
    Gelatin is abnormally stable and a special catalyst has to be used to obtain the correct Kjeldahl nitrogen content.

    (
    http://www.gelatin.co.za/gltn1.html)
     

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