(Electrician advice) installing breaker 15 amp to 20 amp

Apalchen

Well-Known Member
Iv been looking , this one looks legit
On the right track, but see where that says lighted. I've had one of those they will work but it's a pain because the plug is lighted and will glow orange while your light is off. I used foil tape to cover mine when I used it but I'd rather have realized before I bought it.
 

1ManTeam

Active Member
On the right track, but see where that says lighted. I've had one of those they will work but it's a pain because the plug is lighted and will glow orange while your light is off. I used foil tape to cover mine when I used it but I'd rather have realized before I bought it.
thanks but it’s going outside the tent
 

Jbomb999

Member
Mate im an electrician in Australia, so im pretty confident my input will be valid.

First point,

Are you an electrician? If not don't be an idiot and play with shit that can kill you. No matter how easy it might sound, no matter how easy it may in fact be it is just too easy to make a mistake and not only hurt your self but your loved ones who you will leave behind when you either A. Die or .B turn into a crippple. I seriously can't stress enough how stupid it is to play with the invisible dangers of electricity.

Second point,
Assuming you take on this advise you won't be able to do anything anyhow. So to understand why you shouldn't just bump up the breaker size let's look at some theory first.

Current Carrying Capacity (C.C.C), The idea is that a cable size/guage has a maximum C.C.C (there are other derating factors but for this ill keep it simple.

Im my world when I wire a house i need to do the below formula (plus others) to figure out the most cost effective and safe cable sizes.

IB < IN < IZ

Where

IB = maximum load
IN = Circuit breaker size (CB)
IZ = C.C.C of cable

So the load must be less than the CB size, and the CB size must be less than the C.C.C of the cable. We do this to protect the integrity of the cable. Its all about protection.

In australia we use (usually but not always), 2.5mm2 as the standard power point cables which is pretty close to your 14awg cable (2.59mm2 conversion) so if your cable is currently 14awg it could potentially be upgraded 20A CB but don't quote me on that,

BUT

You mentioned its only a 15a CB currently, I would be concerned because it could potentially be 16awg which would be equivalent to my 1.5mm2 and it only has a C.C.C of 18a. If this is the case and you do upgrade the cable, mate your not maybe going to cause a fire you will at some point. Insurance won't cover it.

I hope ive given you somthing to think about though, feel free to ask further questions. I would rather give information than have people misguided by un-informed or un educated people. Fyi in australia it is illigal for people to conduct electrical work without an electrical licence (4 year apprentiship). (Its also illigal to grow green in most states aswell haha)

Good luck happy growing :-)
 

1ManTeam

Active Member
Mate im an electrician in Australia, so im pretty confident my input will be valid.

First point,

Are you an electrician? If not don't be an idiot and play with shit that can kill you. No matter how easy it might sound, no matter how easy it may in fact be it is just too easy to make a mistake and not only hurt your self but your loved ones who you will leave behind when you either A. Die or .B turn into a crippple. I seriously can't stress enough how stupid it is to play with the invisible dangers of electricity.

Second point,
Assuming you take on this advise you won't be able to do anything anyhow. So to understand why you shouldn't just bump up the breaker size let's look at some theory first.

Current Carrying Capacity (C.C.C), The idea is that a cable size/guage has a maximum C.C.C (there are other derating factors but for this ill keep it simple.

Im my world when I wire a house i need to do the below formula (plus others) to figure out the most cost effective and safe cable sizes.

IB < IN < IZ

Where

IB = maximum load
IN = Circuit breaker size (CB)
IZ = C.C.C of cable

So the load must be less than the CB size, and the CB size must be less than the C.C.C of the cable. We do this to protect the integrity of the cable. Its all about protection.

In australia we use (usually but not always), 2.5mm2 as the standard power point cables which is pretty close to your 14awg cable (2.59mm2 conversion) so if your cable is currently 14awg it could potentially be upgraded 20A CB but don't quote me on that,

BUT

You mentioned its only a 15a CB currently, I would be concerned because it could potentially be 16awg which would be equivalent to my 1.5mm2 and it only has a C.C.C of 18a. If this is the case and you do upgrade the cable, mate your not maybe going to cause a fire you will at some point. Insurance won't cover it.

I hope ive given you somthing to think about though, feel free to ask further questions. I would rather give information than have people misguided by un-informed or un educated people. Fyi in australia it is illigal for people to conduct electrical work without an electrical licence (4 year apprentiship). (Its also illigal to grow green in most states aswell haha)

Good luck happy growing :-)
Appreciate your words of wisdom mate, Iv decided to not touch anything at all and first see the two separate outlets can take all the appliances I’m planning to run. If anything the surge protector or circuit breakers will trip to turn off on its own. I’m only running 660 watt led, dehumi, fans , led controller and maybe a portable ac... nothing big , but I’m planning to call a certified electrician if I need anything worked on... thanks again !
 

PadawanWarrior

Well-Known Member
Appreciate your words of wisdom mate, Iv decided to not touch anything at all and first see the two separate outlets can take all the appliances I’m planning to run. If anything the surge protector or circuit breakers will trip to turn off on its own. I’m only running 660 watt led, dehumi, fans , led controller and maybe a portable ac... nothing big , but I’m planning to call a certified electrician if I need anything worked on... thanks again !
The surge protector protects the equipment plugged into it from power surges. It doesn't protect the household wiring. That's what they breakers are for.
 

Jbomb999

Member
Appreciate your words of wisdom mate, Iv decided to not touch anything at all and first see the two separate outlets can take all the appliances I’m planning to run. If anything the surge protector or circuit breakers will trip to turn off on its own. I’m only running 660 watt led, dehumi, fans , led controller and maybe a portable ac... nothing big , but I’m planning to call a certified electrician if I need anything worked on... thanks again !

Mate glad to hear, im currently looking into an indoor grow myself for winter next year as I'm currently just doing my first outdoor grow (im super new to this). But from what I've read so far most of the equiptment for an indoor grow is typically pretty low current draw and even on 15A thats still a heck of alot juice. The only time you really need to be concerned about tripping or overloading is when the circuit is a kitchen or laundry circuit. This is because of high current draw items such as a kettle, toaster and irons , so like I said if its just a normal power circuit I doubt you will have any problems whatsoever ever especially if you choose to go LED.


any further questions happy to help if I can.
 

getogrow

Well-Known Member
The surge protector protects the equipment plugged into it from power surges. It doesn't protect the household wiring. That's what they breakers are for.
Most surge protectors are junk. You have to spend good money on ones that actually protect your devices. That being said , i dont use the expensive ones. im an electrician so i just keep um cool but i would never expect it to trip and save anything. If your goal is an actual surge protector then use google and find a working one. You will be just fine with the power you have. The washing machine is probably on a circuit by itself so you KNOW that circuit is cool to plug into unless you have problems with flickering. (very likely with lights plugged into washing machine)
 

1ManTeam

Active Member
Most surge protectors are junk. You have to spend good money on ones that actually protect your devices. That being said , i dont use the expensive ones. im an electrician so i just keep um cool but i would never expect it to trip and save anything. If your goal is an actual surge protector then use google and find a working one. You will be just fine with the power you have. The washing machine is probably on a circuit by itself so you KNOW that circuit is cool to plug into unless you have problems with flickering. (very likely with lights plugged into washing machine)
Yup , planning to use the washer outlet for the led or portable ac. I should have the light going very soon to test temps at night. I feel weird growing again, it’s been 6 years:weed:
 

Saffasteve

Well-Known Member
I setup my own sub panel and there is more too it than just picking a size of wire and a size of breaker.
Even 12 gauge is too small for a 20 amp breaker if your running for example 18 amps+ through the circuit all day and night long.
So answer me this
How much electricity will you be running through this circuit?
And for how long will this load be on?
Remember even if you have 12 gauge wire you cannot upgrade to a 20 amp breaker if you will be using 18+amps 24 hours a day the wire is not big enough for this type of a load.
20 amp breaker using 12 gauge is only good for partial loads at Around 17amps + not full loads!!!!!
And its scary that no one on here that gave you advice talked about full loads vs partial loads on a circuit.
In my opinion
Don't listen too people on here about electrical advice because you will get bad advice.
Don't start a fire contact a cheap certified electrician in your area, you can get this issue resolved with like 100 bucks.
Gives advice then tells O.P not to take advice from people on this forum lol
 

Saffasteve

Well-Known Member
Mate im an electrician in Australia, so im pretty confident my input will be valid.

First point,

Are you an electrician? If not don't be an idiot and play with shit that can kill you. No matter how easy it might sound, no matter how easy it may in fact be it is just too easy to make a mistake and not only hurt your self but your loved ones who you will leave behind when you either A. Die or .B turn into a crippple. I seriously can't stress enough how stupid it is to play with the invisible dangers of electricity.

Second point,
Assuming you take on this advise you won't be able to do anything anyhow. So to understand why you shouldn't just bump up the breaker size let's look at some theory first.

Current Carrying Capacity (C.C.C), The idea is that a cable size/guage has a maximum C.C.C (there are other derating factors but for this ill keep it simple.

Im my world when I wire a house i need to do the below formula (plus others) to figure out the most cost effective and safe cable sizes.

IB < IN < IZ

Where

IB = maximum load
IN = Circuit breaker size (CB)
IZ = C.C.C of cable

So the load must be less than the CB size, and the CB size must be less than the C.C.C of the cable. We do this to protect the integrity of the cable. Its all about protection.

In australia we use (usually but not always), 2.5mm2 as the standard power point cables which is pretty close to your 14awg cable (2.59mm2 conversion) so if your cable is currently 14awg it could potentially be upgraded 20A CB but don't quote me on that,

BUT

You mentioned its only a 15a CB currently, I would be concerned because it could potentially be 16awg which would be equivalent to my 1.5mm2 and it only has a C.C.C of 18a. If this is the case and you do upgrade the cable, mate your not maybe going to cause a fire you will at some point. Insurance won't cover it.

I hope ive given you somthing to think about though, feel free to ask further questions. I would rather give information than have people misguided by un-informed or un educated people. Fyi in australia it is illigal for people to conduct electrical work without an electrical licence (4 year apprentiship). (Its also illigal to grow green in most states aswell haha)

Good luck happy growing :-)
Someone has read As 3000 ;).
Seriously good advice, O.P should be listening to this dude
 

2com

Well-Known Member
@1ManTeam

I think those style of breakers are called "tandem" breakers (or mini breakers, or mini-combo breakers, etc.). They are actually two separate circuit breakers and can come in a "two different ampacity" configuration (like the picture you've shown with 15A and 20A on the same one).

So, for example, if you had no spaces left in your panel for a new breaker (to run a new circuit), you could remove one of your current standard "single circuit" breakers (for example, a single pole, single throw, single circuit breaker of 15A), and replace it with a "tandem" breaker (mini-combo breaker) that has two actual breakers of the same or differing ampacities (two individual circuit breakers, two individual levers/throws) in the same form factor as the single breaker you removed.
So the new (tandem) would give you a spot to connect right up to the circuit you already had, but also give you another spot/'breaker' for a new/second circuit without needing a new spot in the panel. Though, for this new/second circuit, you'd still need to size and run the appropriate wire, and receptacles, etc. and all that.

Just because something involves danger, doesn't necessarily mean it's difficult. There's just more risk of injury, damage, death, etc.
An introduction to electrical video would probably be of benefit for ya. I don't have one to link but there's lots of good stuff.

Enjoy.
 

pahval

Active Member
I setup my own sub panel and there is more too it than just picking a size of wire and a size of breaker.
Even 12 gauge is too small for a 20 amp breaker if your running for example 18 amps+ through the circuit all day and night long.
So answer me this
How much electricity will you be running through this circuit?
And for how long will this load be on?
Remember even if you have 12 gauge wire you cannot upgrade to a 20 amp breaker if you will be using 18+amps 24 hours a day the wire is not big enough for this type of a load.
20 amp breaker using 12 gauge is only good for partial loads at Around 17amps + not full loads!!!!!
And its scary that no one on here that gave you advice talked about full loads vs partial loads on a circuit.
In my opinion
Don't listen too people on here about electrical advice because you will get bad advice.
Don't start a fire contact a cheap certified electrician in your area, you can get this issue resolved with like 100 bucks.
im professional electrician, i sign all he said... you dont mess with electricity, and you dont ask on forums for help, its cheaper to get a proper electrician than to buy new house...
 

pahval

Active Member
Someone has read As 3000 ;).
Seriously good advice, O.P should be listening to this dude
yep, but please, dont give advices here, people who arent proffesionals tend to think its nothing if you use wire you have, 12 gauge, 14 gauge, its similar right? nope... just hire an electrician...
 
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