Humic Acid Reduces THC???

rkymtnman

Well-Known Member
They're both technically chelating agents so the whole study sound really weird and interesting to me really. I haven't used kelp/humic in late flower though, only to build structure with more axillary shoots and root growth.

Maybe there's a reason some recommended to stop using Kelp/Humic blend about half way in flower? I've always intuitively stopped when I have enough tops, that's normally in mid flower. Cheers!
i did look at the GH feedchart: they say to stop floralicious + at the last week (ripen) . that's their kelp/humic product.

i wouldn't think stopping it for 1 week after using it all bloom and then all of sudden you get a big thc spike right before harvest?? way above what i know though.
 

Wastei

Well-Known Member
but do you think it would have a similar thc reduction as humic? they are more similar than different ( i think?)
They're still debating how they should be classified. They're all under Humic substances: humic acid , fulvic acid and humin.

They're formation is not well understood. Humates are hard to understand scientifically because of their complex molecular structure.
 

Wastei

Well-Known Member
but do you think it would have a similar thc reduction as humic? they are more similar than different ( i think?)
Fulvic acid promotes faster metabolism while Humic doesn't. Have a hard time believing fulvic would have any negative effect in flowering plants if you look what effects it has on humans.

I've read some studies regarding shilajit extracts, that's often +80% fulvic acid. So I have some understanding of where they source their materials and it's effects, I use it daily. Interesting stuff!
 

Rurumo

Well-Known Member
Fulvic acid promotes faster metabolism while Humic doesn't. Have a hard time believing fulvic would have any negative effect in flowering plants if you look what effects it has on humans.

I've read some studies regarding shilajit extracts, that's often +80% fulvic acid. So I have some understanding of where they source their materials and it's effects, I use it daily. Interesting stuff!
The study noted a positive effect on nutrient uptake, just a negative effect on THC....which kind of makes sense. Healthy plants make big buds, but look at the stuff that increases THC-UV and various other stressors. I was surprised by their findings too and it's just one study, but I'm considering dropping fulvic now except for germination.
 

Rdubz

Well-Known Member
The study noted a positive effect on nutrient uptake, just a negative effect on THC....which kind of makes sense. Healthy plants make big buds, but look at the stuff that increases THC-UV and various other stressors. I was surprised by their findings too and it's just one study, but I'm considering dropping fulvic now except for germination.
I feel like it should still have positive effects on vegetative growth just drop it in 12/12 but then again I don't know as much as far as the chemistry behind it it it has any negative lasting effects after using but I feel like thats logical approach just what @waistie saying he intuitively stopped using during bud production so is this study just showing use all the way through entire life cycle and if that's the case I think another study would be appropriate to show stopping use during 12/12....
 

dtcharneski

Active Member
Basically a plant either using its energy to produce mass or metabolites/ with one being sacrificed for the other, that's the balance we try to find high yield/high cannabinoids, the nutrients and light inputs(spectrum) we use all entice production of different compounds used by the plant and stored in the plant, so if anything makes the plant "grow faster"(HA/FA) its taking energy from the nutrient production(cannabinoids, terps etc), and vice versa. ie, uvb light creates stress, plant growth slows but trichrome production increases. Or kushman chiropractics or supper cropping. you stress the plant in response growth slows but auxin is produced faster and then boom explosive growth
 

Wastei

Well-Known Member
Basically a plant either using its energy to produce mass or metabolites/ with one being sacrificed for the other, that's the balance we try to find high yield/high cannabinoids, the nutrients and light inputs(spectrum) we use all entice production of different compounds used by the plant and stored in the plant, so if anything makes the plant "grow faster"(HA/FA) its taking energy from the nutrient production(cannabinoids, terps etc), and vice versa. ie, uvb light creates stress, plant growth slows but trichrome production increases. Or kushman chiropractics or supper cropping. you stress the plant in response growth slows but auxin is produced faster and then boom explosive growth
It's an interesting read for sure. There's so many variables to give a clear answer and like I stated before it's just one study. What about if you were to introduce natural PGR's in kelp would you see the same results? Auxins and cytokinin a have synergistic effects with humates.

The study is really interesting but like all other it's not perfect. I would like to see a side by side with one clone getting kelp/humic from start to mid flower and the other clone completely without.

I would also like to see different extracts being used and know the extraction method to really know all the variables. There's different kinds of extracts, crude and filtered.

You need to know the extraction method, growing method (soil/hydro) and rate and type of application IMO.
 

dtcharneski

Active Member
It's an interesting read for sure. There's so many variables to give a clear answer and like I stated before it's just one study. What about if you were to introduce natural PGR's in kelp would you see the same results? Auxins and cytokinin a have synergistic effects with humates.

The study is really interesting but like all other it's not perfect. I would like to see a side by side with one clone getting kelp/humic from start to mid flower and the other clone completely without.

I would also like to see different extracts being used and know the extraction method to really know all the variables. There's different kinds of extracts, crude and filtered.

You need to know the extraction method, growing method (soil/hydro) and rate and type of application IMO.
yes I agree they needed to broaden there test scope, I hate that most research papers seem to just super focus on just one aspect, just n uptake or k uptake etc,etc, even though its been shown its a multitude of variables involved and I would love to see a test done using a wide range of different inputs, strains, npk ratios, additives/microbes, light spectrums/intensities and see how everything correlates
 

dtcharneski

Active Member
in this one they tested coco and fertilization rates/ nutrient ppms
over fertilization led to higher yield but less total cannabinoids
 

radiant Rudy

Well-Known Member
I read the humic acid piece about a year or so ago. I posted a few references to it other sites. No one was much interested.

Since then i admit i cut back on using humate products. Yet i wonder if this particular study might be somehow misleading. I checked into other medicinal and essential oil type plants and every study i saw detailed improved production of medicinal compounds. In basil, lavender, artemesia, fennel and others humates and proper nutrition elicited desirable outcomes.

Considering the dramatic loss of potency through humate use shown in that paper it is puzzling that humate use is little discussed and continues to be considered best practice in ag, horticulture, and high value medicinal plants.
 

rkymtnman

Well-Known Member
I read the humic acid piece about a year or so ago. I posted a few references to it other sites. No one was much interested.

Since then i admit i cut back on using humate products. Yet i wonder if this particular study might be somehow misleading. I checked into other medicinal and essential oil type plants and every study i saw detailed improved production of medicinal compounds. In basil, lavender, artemesia, fennel and others humates and proper nutrition elicited desirable outcomes.

Considering the dramatic loss of potency through humate use shown in that paper it is puzzling that humate use is little discussed and continues to be considered best practice in ag, horticulture, and high value medicinal plants.
i might just send Dr Faust an email( think that's his name) from BioAg. they are the copany that makes Ful-Power and other humic additives and see what he thinks.
 

Rurumo

Well-Known Member
I have a crop two weeks into flower right now, so I cut out all humic/fulvic acid because of this.
I'll contact Sumo and/or AEA and ask if they are aware of the study. I doubt we are first to bring it to their attention. Very interested to get a response from humate producers, apostles, scientists.
Oh gosh, they'll all be rabidly against this study since it's bad for business. I'm interested in the authors' hypothesis that different pathways are involved in this humic acid/thc lowering effect than in other plants that have shown an increase in essential oils/terpenes. Considering the overall quality of their research papers, and the fact that their other findings match up closely with what I've observed, I've stopped giving humic/fulvic acid to my plants in flower. I'll def keep it around for germination, cuttings, foliar sprays in veg, etc, but no more during flower for now.
 
>
Top