Outdoor BC 2021

deezus

Well-Known Member
After a few months of preparation my girls are in their homes for the year.

Dug holes and lined the outside with heavy duty plastic, the 3 smaller holes are about 350L of soil and the big ones around 550L. Used a mix of ProMix HP, triple mix, steer manure, and some of the existing soil.

Started from seed in February, currently running:

Red Poison x 3 (Sweet Seeds)
Blueberry x 1 (Canuk Seeds)
Kali Mist x 1 (unknown)

Looking forward to the season, and seeing those outdoor monsters on the forum this year. Cheers everyone.
 

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deezus

Well-Known Member
Been nearly 2 months but the girls are getting THICK. Unfortunately had to dig up and transplant my two biggest plants, but they survived and have resumed growing. 40+ degrees the last few days but they seem to be loving it.

Hope you're all enjoying the heat, cheers!
 

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deezus

Well-Known Member
The girls survived the BC heat wave, had 4 consecutive days over 45 C but they seemed to power through no problem. Hit the 6 foot mark on two of them now, they're gonna be monsters by October provided we dont get smoked out from all the wildfires. Fingers crossed, but looking good so far.
 

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garybo

Well-Known Member
Nice job of growing, though I grow a lot further south then you. I like the way you are keeping the ladies short and not outgrowing the fence.
 

Danielson999

Well-Known Member
I use Mega Crop.
I'm going out on a limb here and guessing that he was asking that question to deezus. :D

@deezus

Hello, I'm in the Okanagan and throw plants out every year. My plants that are in-ground were fine, some that were in pots had a bit of a tough time from that heat wave. One thing that surprised me a bit about your grow is when you started. I started earlier in the year like you when I first started growing outside but quickly changed my ways. You can start plants indoors in May and throw them outside in late May and they will be equally as big as yours are now. So nowadays I start later simply because it saves me extra weeks/months of maintaining them and using up resources like nutes, indoor lighting etc. When I start them in May I can throw them outside on the covered deck and harden them off at a young age because the temps at night are warm enough. It saves a bit of time and money is all I'm saying. Some people might prefer to have them growing earlier simply because they enjoy the extra time gardening. Not questioning why you started yours when you did, just saying what my preferences have become after growing outdoors the last while. For me, the less labour involved the better for physical reasons.

So I was curious what your expectations were for lining the holes with plastic? I give my plants a 5'x5' plot each in raised beds but never thought of adding plastic. I did throw small-spaced wire fencing under the beds to keep voles/moles from eating the roots.

Oh, did you line with plastic because you use salt-based nutes and want to make it easy to remove the soil after the growing season?
Also, what are the bricks for?
 
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Rjt08

Member
I'm going out on a limb here and guessing that he was asking that question to deezus. :D

@deezus

Hello, I'm in the Okanagan and throw plants out every year. My plants that are in-ground were fine, some that were in pots had a bit of a tough time from that heat wave. One thing that surprised me a bit about your grow is when you started. I started earlier in the year like you when I first started growing outside but quickly changed my ways. You can start plants indoors in May and throw them outside in late May and they will be equally as big as yours are now. So nowadays I start later simply because it saves me extra weeks/months of maintaining them and using up resources like nutes, indoor lighting etc. When I start them in May I can throw them outside on the covered deck and harden them off at a young age because the temps at night are warm enough. It saves a bit of time and money is all I'm saying. Some people might prefer to have them growing earlier simply because they enjoy the extra time gardening. Not questioning why you started yours when you did, just saying what my preferences have become after growing outdoors the last while. For me, the less labour involved the better for physical reasons.

So I was curious what your expectations were for lining the holes with plastic? I give my plants a 5'x5' plot each in raised beds but never thought of adding plastic. I did throw small-spaced wire fencing under the beds to keep voles/moles from eating the roots.

Oh, did you line with plastic because you use salt-based nutes and want to make it easy to remove the soil after the growing season?
Also, what are the bricks for?
What are you using for nutes in the okanagan
 

Danielson999

Well-Known Member
What are you using for nutes in the okanagan
I load my soil up with compost I make with food scraps, grass clippings etc. I also throw in lots of manure, blood meal and a few other basics. Once the plants take off I make a tea with worm castings, fish fertilizer, molasses and a handful of garden compost or soil. Then in flower I make teas quite similar but I use seaweed instead of fish fertilizer.
The first couple years I started the plants indoors in say March, put outside in May. They ended up being 12'-13' tall. I had to add extensions to my hoop house so they fit inside it which was a real pain. It's also no fun having to climb a ladder every time you want to check on your colas. I make a screen of green now and start them from seed in May just to keep them from going crazy.
 

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deezus

Well-Known Member
I'm going out on a limb here and guessing that he was asking that question to deezus. :D

@deezus

Hello, I'm in the Okanagan and throw plants out every year. My plants that are in-ground were fine, some that were in pots had a bit of a tough time from that heat wave. One thing that surprised me a bit about your grow is when you started. I started earlier in the year like you when I first started growing outside but quickly changed my ways. You can start plants indoors in May and throw them outside in late May and they will be equally as big as yours are now. So nowadays I start later simply because it saves me extra weeks/months of maintaining them and using up resources like nutes, indoor lighting etc. When I start them in May I can throw them outside on the covered deck and harden them off at a young age because the temps at night are warm enough. It saves a bit of time and money is all I'm saying. Some people might prefer to have them growing earlier simply because they enjoy the extra time gardening. Not questioning why you started yours when you did, just saying what my preferences have become after growing outdoors the last while. For me, the less labour involved the better for physical reasons.

So I was curious what your expectations were for lining the holes with plastic? I give my plants a 5'x5' plot each in raised beds but never thought of adding plastic. I did throw small-spaced wire fencing under the beds to keep voles/moles from eating the roots.

Oh, did you line with plastic because you use salt-based nutes and want to make it easy to remove the soil after the growing season?
Also, what are the bricks for?
Hey neighbor, glad your plants survived the heat. Hopefully the smoke doesn't cause any issues either, it's brutal in the N. Thompson.

I have generally started my plants in April then stuck them outside in May, but I had just cropped some indoors in Feb and figured I'd try vegging a few months in my tent before putting them out to see how big I could get them. It's definitely a little more labour intensive keeping things trimmed up and trained, but working from home has allowed me to keep on top of it.

In terms of using the plastic, I live on an old flood plain and the ground is mostly hardpack clay and rock with next to no organic material. I wanted to keep my soil (mix of ProMix HP, manure, triplemix) contained to serve as more of a container than open ground. I used to do this in backwoods grows to contain my holes and it's always served me well. Also have some mesh around the top to prevent critters from getting in.

The cinder blocks were to keep dogs out, we had some people staying here with a few dogs after they got evacuated from the fires. I have a portable wire fence around them normally but I had to move it for the time being.

Despite the extra work I'm happy with the results so far, we'll see how she goes later in the year. Good luck with your season!
 

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Rjt08

Member
Hey neighbor, glad your plants survived the heat. Hopefully the smoke doesn't cause any issues either, it's brutal in the N. Thompson.

I have generally started my plants in April then stuck them outside in May, but I had just cropped some indoors in Feb and figured I'd try vegging a few months in my tent before putting them out to see how big I could get them. It's definitely a little more labour intensive keeping things trimmed up and trained, but working from home has allowed me to keep on top of it.

In terms of using the plastic, I live on an old flood plain and the ground is mostly hardpack clay and rock with next to no organic material. I wanted to keep my soil (mix of ProMix HP, manure, triplemix) contained to serve as more of a container than open ground. I used to do this in backwoods grows to contain my holes and it's always served me well. Also have some mesh around the top to prevent critters from getting in.

The cinder blocks were to keep dogs out, we had some people staying here with a few dogs after they got evacuated from the fires. I have a portable wire fence around them normally but I had to move it for the time being.

Despite the extra work I'm happy with the results so far, we'll see how she goes later in the year. Good luck with your season!
Hey neighbors central okanagan here my girls didn't mind the heat, a lot more watering for me tho.
 

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deezus

Well-Known Member
What are you using for nutes?
Currently they're just feeding off the soil, roughly 1/3 mushroom or steer manure mixed with promix HP and triple mix. Once they start flowering I'll give them a compost tea, and a couple will get some Green Planet GP3 nutes that I use for my indoor plants.
 

deezus

Well-Known Member
Think I've reached the 7 foot mark now on the tallest Red Poison, the Kali Mist isnt far behind. The yard is starting to smell skunky despite the smoke, looking forward to seeing some buds start to develop :)
 

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