Shrooms from cow pastures

Wizzlebiz

Well-Known Member
Good Morning RIU.

I know nothing about how mushrooms grow. I've heard you can find them in cow pastures at certain times of the year, day? Idk.

How does this work? I have legal access to cow pastures as a friend just bought a ranch.

So yea how does this work?

Actually I probably should ask does this work at all?

Thanks RIU
Wizz
 

Dreaming1

Well-Known Member
Well, it works like this: cows are magic. Look into their eyes. Yes... Now you see.
Life is like Russian nesting dolls. Deeper and deeper and deeper levels holding more and more and more living things. Weird shit. Speaking of, cows make a lot of shit. They eat grass. Unless you feed them grain and keep them from grasses. Spores of fungi are on the earth. They are not harmed by the enzymatic actions of bovine digestion. They flow out of the cow and are redeposited on the earth. Then the spores have a water filled matrix of the appropriate food source, heat, and the love of God. So life tries to live. And it do. It lives.
There are several fungal species specializing in the recovery of nutrients from fecal material. You have to figure out who is who. How do you know if the spores of the fungus you would like to see are present? Microscopy. You could even buy spores of known species to compare yours to. If you don't have the spores present, you can't have the fungus. So present the spores. And if you feed cattle grains treated with fungicides to prevent rotting feed, then you are preventing fungi. Cycles. You're in one. You are one. We are all one. You are us.
That's what I've heard anyway...
 

kovidkough

Well-Known Member
horse poop too, I think its just the spores like the warm moist environment to spawn

I second spore prints before consuming please becareful, blue Meanies have alot of look alikes that are toxic
 

Wizzlebiz

Well-Known Member
Well, it works like this: cows are magic. Look into their eyes. Yes... Now you see.
Life is like Russian nesting dolls. Deeper and deeper and deeper levels holding more and more and more living things. Weird shit. Speaking of, cows make a lot of shit. They eat grass. Unless you feed them grain and keep them from grasses. Spores of fungi are on the earth. They are not harmed by the enzymatic actions of bovine digestion. They flow out of the cow and are redeposited on the earth. Then the spores have a water filled matrix of the appropriate food source, heat, and the love of God. So life tries to live. And it do. It lives.
There are several fungal species specializing in the recovery of nutrients from fecal material. You have to figure out who is who. How do you know if the spores of the fungus you would like to see are present? Microscopy. You could even buy spores of known species to compare yours to. If you don't have the spores present, you can't have the fungus. So present the spores. And if you feed cattle grains treated with fungicides to prevent rotting feed, then you are preventing fungi. Cycles. You're in one. You are one. We are all one. You are us.
That's what I've heard anyway...
I'm not sure if I learned anything here but I must say I feel spiritually enriched.
 

Beehive

Well-Known Member
I've been around cattle most of my life. Don't go pulling mushrooms out cow shit. Shrooms like it as well as other mushrooms. Pinching the stem to see if it'll bruise blue doesn't always work.

PF Cakes

60 days is all it takes. No poop involved. Brown rice flour and vermiculite. Spore syringe, tub, humidifier, and perlite for the tub. 4 jars will fruit about 3 times. More then enough to last through watching The Big Lebowski. Several times over.
 

MustGro

Member
Good Morning RIU.

I know nothing about how mushrooms grow. I've heard you can find them in cow pastures at certain times of the year, day? Idk.

How does this work? I have legal access to cow pastures as a friend just bought a ranch.

So yea how does this work?

Actually I probably should ask does this work at all?

Thanks RIU
Wizz
My friends and I used to pick them that way in the 80's, but there were more cows around then. It took cow shit and cold weather to get shrooms. October or November after the first frost was the time. I've since learned that they were liberty caps. Small tops, about as big as the first joint of your little finger usually. Real long thin stem with a mean purple tint to the stem. They were usually in bunches of 20, maybe 30 or more. The most I ever got was a baggie full but I've heard stories of people filling garbage bags. It could get that big I guess. You were supposed to shake them around after you picked them so the spores got scattered. If someone was smart you could seed a pretty big patch. I don't see them anymore. About 20 was a super nice energy hit. The most I ever had was about 30 fresh tasty shrooms. Super high teen. Some folks ate up around 100 and got hallucinations.
 

yummy fur

Well-Known Member
Well, it works like this: cows are magic. Look into their eyes. Yes... Now you see.
Life is like Russian nesting dolls. Deeper and deeper and deeper levels holding more and more and more living things. Weird shit. Speaking of, cows make a lot of shit. They eat grass. Unless you feed them grain and keep them from grasses. Spores of fungi are on the earth. T
The cows around where I live are very pretty, some look like Indian cows with huge humps on their back, others have what looks like a chinchilla fur coat. I was reading only last week that cows don't really eat grass they chew the grass up and use it to grow bacteria, which is what they actually eat.
 

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Wastei

Well-Known Member
horse poop too, I think its just the spores like the warm moist environment to spawn

I second spore prints before consuming please becareful, blue Meanies have alot of look alikes that are toxic
Horse poo is not the best place to hunt for magic mushrooms from my experience, good as a substrate though for growing Cubensis indoor. Liberty Caps(psilocybe semilanceata) doesn't like horses.

Maybe they grow in horse dung natively where you're at lol. Cheers!
 

Allbr

Well-Known Member
Good Morning RIU.

I know nothing about how mushrooms grow. I've heard you can find them in cow pastures at certain times of the year, day? Idk.

How does this work? I have legal access to cow pastures as a friend just bought a ranch.

So yea how does this work?

Actually I probably should ask does this work at all?

Thanks RIU
Wizz
In eastern Canada we get almost all our mushrooms from cow dung.
When I was younger we would go in the fields early on a foggy morning and get lots of them ( not sure if the fog has anything to do with the mushrooms)
Under and growing in the dung would be tons of magic mushrooms.
Simply wash and dry and hold on because it's powerful stuff
 

talon

Well-Known Member
Back home in East Texas, they grow in some cow fields and not in others. Like you could get a pound out of one field and then literally cross a fence and not find a single one. I've always thought this was due to what the cows are being fed but I'm not sure.

We'd always wait until Late May through June, with the temps consistently hitting the high 70's but not crossing into the 90's yet consistently. Cubensis can't handle night time dips into the 50's so we'd usually just wait until night time temps were only dipping to the low 60's to ensure a good haul. We'd hunt about 36 hours after a good rain shower. You'd just find them popping up out of old dung stacks and pull them up. We'd tap the caps a couple times before we pulled them to ensure the spores fell to the ground. You learn pretty quickly what they look like and I'll toss a picture in of what a cube stem looks like when it is bruised. It turns a blueish purple color. If it doesn't bruise like this, it isn't a cubensis. We'd trim off the bottoms and then toss them in a food dehydrator overnight.

East Texas and Southeast Texas are probably one of the nicest environments for Cubensis mushrooms in the world though with the high humidity and temperature, so I figured I'd show off my haul from the last time I went hunting a few years ago. I think I snagged a quarter pound off of 30 minutes of picking? It's been a while so I don't remember the exact dry weight. Every batch in the wild hits completely differently. I remember these being insanely visual.

Also attaching a picture of a beautiful Cube that ended up drying to 5 grams, which is insane. I believe that's it next to that lighter. You can see an equally large one on the right of that same tile.

59mtobyrll6z.jpg

IMG_6039.JPG

received_10213264572559036.jpg
 

xtsho

Well-Known Member
My friends and I used to pick them that way in the 80's, but there were more cows around then. It took cow shit and cold weather to get shrooms. October or November after the first frost was the time. I've since learned that they were liberty caps. Small tops, about as big as the first joint of your little finger usually. Real long thin stem with a mean purple tint to the stem. They were usually in bunches of 20, maybe 30 or more. The most I ever got was a baggie full but I've heard stories of people filling garbage bags. It could get that big I guess. You were supposed to shake them around after you picked them so the spores got scattered. If someone was smart you could seed a pretty big patch. I don't see them anymore. About 20 was a super nice energy hit. The most I ever had was about 30 fresh tasty shrooms. Super high teen. Some folks ate up around 100 and got hallucinations.
We picked back in the day here in Oregon. Liberty Caps were the most prevalent but there were several other varieties that could be found. We picked in Tillamook, Astoria, across the river in Washington. They grow all over. We picked them in an old pasture on Kruse Way and 217. Before they made them illegal to possess there would be hundreds of people picking in some fields.

As for the garbage bags we were pretty damn close. We'd have tea parties and make huge pots of mushroom tea. I dried them, powdered them up and filled gelatin capsules which I would sell 2 for $1 back in High School. I'm sure they are still growing at many of the same places but they're classified as a controlled substance now so you can get in trouble for picking them. Before they were illegal all you had to do was worry about some farmer chasing you out of their field or letting their dogs loose. We had to run for it several times.

You don't need cows around to find them. But they did grow quite prolifically in old cow pastures. I remember picking them next to the Astoria airport right alongside cows.

I haven't picked them for decades and wouldn't eat them again but we had a ton of fun back when I was younger. The only mushrooms I pick anymore are edible food source mushrooms like Chanterelles. Last time I picked those I came home with around 20 pounds for a couple hours of picking.
 

talon

Well-Known Member
That whole thread being said, most areas of the country have some type of psychedelic mushrooms but they all differ in what type you're going to find and on what substrate.

Best thing to do is look up your state/city/area + psychedelic mushrooms and see what threads pop up online. If there's free drugs growing in the ground near you someone is definitely mentioning it online. LOL
 
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