Why I hope Trump's future trial is televised.

DaFreak

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't be concerned about their feelings at all, indeed the problem is you cared too much.
Look, calm the fck down and think before you start acting like an idiot. How the fck is that my problem? Explain that one if you can. And in my opinion saying that you don't care how 74 million Americans care is not setting yourself up to win.
 

DaFreak

Well-Known Member
You want to absolve him of all those crimes you say he committed?

You have a different view of justice than I do.
Absolve him would be the wrong way to put it. I would prefer we ignore it. He's guilty as guilty can be, but the country doesn't win anything by convicting him. This is not about right and wrong, it's about what's best for the country moving forward. Same reason Nixon wasn't convicted. We have to much in this country to work on. We need to lesson the gap between the haves and have nots. We need to work on our racial problem, we need to work on our education and our failing infrastructure. We don't have the luxury of years of courts to appease our thirst for revenge masking as us being righteous.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
Absolve him would be the wrong way to put it. I would prefer we ignore it. He's guilty as guilty can be, but the country doesn't win anything by convicting him. This is not about right and wrong, it's about what's best for the country moving forward. Same reason Nixon wasn't convicted. We have to much in this country to work on. We need to lesson the gap between the haves and have nots. We need to work on our racial problem, we need to work on our education and our failing infrastructure. We don't have the luxury of years of courts to appease our thirst for revenge masking as us being righteous.
It is not like those things could not be worked on while one trial was going on.

I would argue that you drain the poison (money) from the wound of all those racist propagandists that have been funding Trump and the southern strategy they have been running since at least the 70's and the Democrats will have a much easier time working to fix the issues you listed.

Otherwise they just keep up their divisiveness and funding of their campaign of hate.
 

DaFreak

Well-Known Member
We'll see. I want the Republican Party to get back to what they once were, and I think the easiest way for them to do that is without them being forced to defend Trump because they are too afraid of pissing off those 74 million Americans who voted for him. Of course I never agreed with the Republicans, I'm a socialist at heart, but we need a government that can work together.
 

CunningCanuk

Well-Known Member
Absolve him would be the wrong way to put it. I would prefer we ignore it. He's guilty as guilty can be, but the country doesn't win anything by convicting him. This is not about right and wrong, it's about what's best for the country moving forward. Same reason Nixon wasn't convicted. We have to much in this country to work on. We need to lesson the gap between the haves and have nots. We need to work on our racial problem, we need to work on our education and our failing infrastructure. We don't have the luxury of years of courts to appease our thirst for revenge masking as us being righteous.
Why does the justice process and the courts doing their thing distract from fixing the problems you stated?

I think letting trump get away with all he’s done would do more damage than bringing charges. It’s not about revenge, it’s about justice.

Trump should be treated like every other citizen. Nothing more, nothing less. He should be permitted to have his day in court like every American.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
We'll see. I want the Republican Party to get back to what they once were, and I think the easiest way for them to do that is without them being forced to defend Trump because they are too afraid of pissing off those 74 million Americans who voted for him. Of course I never agreed with the Republicans, I'm a socialist at heart, but we need a government that can work together.
I agree with the Republican party needing to get back to being a responsible part of the government.

But they are in desperate need to having all their dirty deeds dragged out and exposed.

It should have been done after 2008, but unfortunately they doubled down after McCain stood up against the hate mongering they push.


 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
You know that it would be all consuming
Just means more can get done without the circus IMO. There is a reason for the different branches of government. Let the Judicial branch do it's duty while Biden works on healing the nation and helping get us back on track after 4 years of nonsense.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Look, calm the fck down and think before you start acting like an idiot. How the fck is that my problem? Explain that one if you can. And in my opinion saying that you don't care how 74 million Americans care is not setting yourself up to win.
I'm quite calm, just meditated a while ago. Why should you care what some fucking moral failure of a traitor thinks? Seriously, do you care what a born yesterday pseudo Christian thinks? They think the world is 5,000 years old because their heads are full of shit, no different than those who supported Trump. If you think Trump is next to Jesus, and the world is 5,000 years old, you might as well believe the earth is flat. I'm gonna ridicule you for holding a ridiculous belief not based on facts, but on bullshit that you choose to believe. I even respect normal Christians too and tolerate a wide variety of beliefs and practices, but not those that harm others and those who hold them.

There are more than 74 million Trumpers in America, they voted for Trumpism, but enough couldn't stomach him to vote for him. It does not matter if there is a majority of them either, the constitution makes this plain, if you don't support it you are not a patriot and that was their moral failure, they didn't protect and defend the constitution, they betrayed it, the country and you.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/trump-tax-returns-new-york-investigation/2020/12/29/11c43a38-43c8-11eb-b0e4-0f182923a025_story.html
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NEW YORK — The Manhattan District Attorney's Office has retained forensic accounting specialists to aid its criminal investigation of President Trump and his business operations, as prosecutors ramp up their scrutiny of his company's real estate transactions, according to people familiar with the matter.

District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. opened the investigation in 2018 to examine alleged hush-money payments made to two women who, during Trump’s first presidential campaign, claimed to have had affairs with him years earlier. The probe has since expanded, and now includes the Trump Organization's activities more broadly, said the people familiar with the matter. Vance’s office has suggested in court filings that bank, tax and insurance fraud are areas of exploration.

Vance has contracted with FTI Consulting to look for anomalies among a variety of property deals, and to advise the district attorney on whether the president’s company manipulated the value of certain assets to obtain favorable interest rates and tax breaks, according to a person with knowledge of the investigation who, like others, spoke on the condition of anonymity because the matter remains highly sensitive. The probe is believed to encompass transactions spanning several years.

Spokesmen for Vance and FTI Consulting declined to comment.

Representatives for the Trump Organization did not respond to a request for comment. In the past, company officials have rejected the merits of Vance’s investigation, calling it politically motivated.

Trump’s post-presidency will be cluttered with legal battles

Headquartered in Washington, FTI provides a range of financial advisory services to clients worldwide in public and corporate sectors. “We provide the industry's most complete range of forensic, investigative, data analytic and litigation services,” according to a corporate brochure, which also noted FTI’s “extensive experience serving leading corporations, governments and law firms around the globe.”

The analysts hired by Vance probably have already reviewed various bank and mortgage records obtained from Trump’s company as part of the ongoing grand jury investigation, and they could be called on to testify about their findings should the district attorney eventually bring criminal charges, said the person familiar with the arrangement.


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In Trump, “you have a very high-profile person who is polarizing,” Zirkle said, “and then you also have a district attorney who is elected. You can't ignore those facts, and that they're both of different political parties.” Vance can now say, “We've gotten with a global advisory firm . . . that can come in and take an objective look at this, and we’re outsourcing everything to them in the way of the analysis so that it doesn't look like we're just going after Donald Trump,” Zirkle added.

Loan payments loom as Trump fights for his political future — and the future of his business

It is possible Vance could find evidence that the Trump Organization as a business entity has broken the law, without attaching personal liability to Trump or other individuals at his company. To bring criminal charges, the district attorney must be able to prove there was an intent to break the law — which probably would require the testimony of an insider witness, experts have said.

It’s unclear whether Vance has secured such testimony, though in recent weeks his team has spoken with employees at Deutsche Bank, a major lender for the Trump Organization, and the insurance brokerage Aon. Those discussion were first reported by the New York Times. Prosecutors have issued new subpoenas and met with witnesses at a steady pace, people familiar with the process have said.

A spokeswoman for Aon, Nadine Youssef, confirmed that the insurance company received a subpoena from the district attorney’s office but declined to discuss what records had been requested.

“As is our policy, we intend to cooperate with all regulatory bodies,” Youssef said. “We do not comment on specific client matters.”

A spokesperson for Deutsche Bank declined to comment.

Judge orders Trump's company to give more records to N.Y. attorney general

Vance’s probe is one of two investigations in New York that could pose serious legal peril for the president once he leaves office next month. New York Attorney General Letitia James is overseeing a civil investigation into the Trump Organization and its business operations. There appears to be at least some overlap in the deals and loans that are under review by the two agencies.

Additionally, the president faces separate defamation lawsuits brought by two women who have accused him of sexual assault.

His niece, Mary L. Trump, is suing him and his siblings as well over a multimillion-dollar inheritance dispute. He’s also being sued by the tenants of several apartment buildings his family once owned, and by people who say they saw little to no profit after joining a multilevel marketing organization touted by Trump and his children.

In all instances, Trump or his representatives have denied any wrongdoing.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
extradition to where and by whom, exactly, for what crimes?
If Trump runs to Moscow and bunks with Snowden, America will never get to see him face justice.

Are you actually interested in Trump's crimes or are you just trolling because you are upset about something Trump is brainwashing his followers with?
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
Looks like Trump's about a possible 28% of the people voting for him are the hardcore cultists (with about 19% sane enough to not want to say they are all in). 20% of overall voters (10% not wanting to admit it) are possibly in his cult.

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hanimmal

Well-Known Member
https://apnews.com/article/donald-trump-new-york-trump-investigations-us-news-manhattan-55dd15e84db5fa7d4dcded088f39e888
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NEW YORK (AP) — New York prosecutors conducted an hourslong interview Thursday of Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal attorney, asking a range of questions about Trump’s business dealings, according to three people familiar with the meeting.

The interview focused in part on Trump’s relationship with Deutsche Bank, his biggest and longest standing creditor, according to the three people, who weren’t authorized to discuss the investigation and spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity.

The interview, at least the second of Cohen by the Manhattan district attorney’s office, comes amid a long-running grand jury investigation into Trump’s business dealings. District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. has been waging a protracted legal battle to get access to the president’s tax records.

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule on Trump’s request for a stay and a further appeal after he leaves office Jan. 20.

The New York investigation is one of several legal entanglements that are likely to intensify as Trump loses power — and any immunity from prosecution he might have as a sitting president — as he departs the White House.

The Manhattan-based grand jury has been continuing its work despite the coronavirus pandemic, which has curtailed many court operations.

The Republican president also faces a civil investigation, led by New York Attorney General Letitia James, into whether Trump’s company lied about the value of its assets to get loans or tax benefits. Cohen also is cooperating with that inquiry.

He previously told Congress that Trump often inflated the value of his assets when dealing with lenders or potential business partners, but deflated them when it benefited him for tax purposes.

The White House declined to comment. A message seeking comment was sent to Cohen’s attorney.

Trump has repeatedly called the investigations by Vance and James, both Democrats, a baseless political “witch hunt.”

Vance has declined to provide specific details about the investigation, but pointed to news reports of what prosecutors described as “extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the Trump Organization” in court filings.

Among the reports Vance’s office referenced in court filings was a 2017 article about Ladder Capital, a commercial mortgage lender that made more than $250 million in loans to the Trump Organization that were secured by Trump properties. Jack Weisselberg, the son of Trump Organization Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg, is a director of Ladder Capital.

Subpoenas issued in the investigation cover 11 entities engaged in business dealings as far away as Europe and Dubai, according to an appeals court judge speaking at a hearing on the matter.

Cohen, who is serving the remainder of a federal prison sentence on home confinement, has been asked by investigators to examine certain Trump Organization documents and to provide other details about its corporate structure, the people familiar with the matter said. Cohen pleaded guilty to evading taxes, lying to Congress and facilitating campaign finance crimes.

Germany-based Deutsche Bank continued to do business with Trump even after he defaulted in 2008 on a loan for his Chicago hotel and condo development. Trump sued the bank and others whom he blamed for his inability to repay.

But Deutsche Bank’s private banking division continued to lend to Trump, including $125 million to finance the purchase and renovation of his Doral golf resort in 2012, according to previous disclosures.

Deutsche Bank declined to comment.
 
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