Big Game Hunters, Show Your Stuff

GreatwhiteNorth

Global Moderator
Staff member
Awesome man, I love your state. Hope you bag a nice one. I just got back from a fishing trip on the Kenai, spent some time around Anchorage too. I was going to post some fish pics in the fishing thread but couldn't find it last night, lol. It's just called "fishing" right?
https://www.rollitup.org/t/fishing.805626/page-62#post-15041701

C2G gets all the credit for finding the thread - she has quick digits. Lol.
How did the fishing go btw?

Edit: Looks like BB was under the wire first after all. :wink:
 
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BarnBuster

Virtually Unknown Member
You all might enjoy this story as well as this book that was just published about Jim Corbett.
No beast so fierce : the terrifying true story of the Champawat Tiger, the deadliest animal in history / Dane Huckelbridge.

A Close Call in Muktesar

by John Seerey-Lester | Aug 15, 2019 |, Sporting Classics Daily



"The long search for the man-eating tigress was coming to an end and the hunter was poised to bring a permanent halt to the killer’s reign of terror. After a trek lasting three days, he was finally going to come face to face with his deadly quarry. He knew that the slightest disturbance in the bush could cause the tigress to flee.

That day and on previous days, Jim Corbett had a team of some 30 beaters working hard to flush and drive the tigress toward him. They were not having much luck and were about to call it a day and try again the following morning when Corbett’s attention was drawn to a distant field adjacent to a village.

He couldn’t believe his eyes. The elusive tigress was casually walking toward them about 400 yards away. Corbett looked for some cover and a good position from which to take his shot. Meanwhile, the big cat started down a ravine toward a narrow stream. Corbett quickly made his way to where he hoped to get a shot before or after she crossed the water, but there was insufficient cover.

As the tigress began to climb over the crest of the hill, Corbett knew he’d have to move fast if he was going to cut her off before she disappeared. Determined not to lose his chance, he had no other option but to race headlong through a tunnel of thorn bushes that tore at his skin and clothes.

With blood trickling down his face, the hunter eventually scrambled out the thorns and found a vantage point above the ravine where he expected to see the tigress feeding on the carcass of an old bullock he had put there the day before. As he crawled up to the rim, he was relieved to hear bones cracking below him, which meant the tigress had found the kill.

During the early half of the 20th century, Jim Corbett was one of the most famous hunters of man-eating tigers and leopards. Born in 1875 of Irish ancestry in the small Himalayan town of Nainital in the Kumaon area of northern British India (now the State of Uttarakhand), Edward James Corbett soon became dedicated to ridding Indian villages of the killer cats.

During his long hunting career, he never slayed a tiger or leopard unless it was killing humans. It’s estimated that the cats he killed were responsible for the deaths of some 1,200 men, women and children.

Around the mid 1920s, Corbett had been called to Muktesar, a small picturesque settlement in the shadow of the Himalayas. Apparently a troublesome tigress had taken up residence in the forest area near a Veterinary Research Institute specializing in fighting cattle diseases.

The tigress had quickly graduated from attacking livestock to killing humans. At least 24 people had been killed by the tigress and something had to be done about her. Like most man-eaters, the big cat had probably suffered an injury that caused a change in her diet from wild animals to humans, a much easier source of prey.

The tigress was terrorizing and endangering the lives of the villagers as well as workers at the institute. Because it was a Government-run facility that was doing important work, it became a priority to find someone who could resolve the situation.

Corbett was called in, though at first he was hesitant; he worried that he might be stepping on the toes of the sportsmen who lived around the institute and who had tried unsuccessfully to kill the tigress. But after hearing the horror stories of how people had been brutally slain, he signed on for the task.


Corbett always required physical evidence of an attack or to be taken to the site of the tragedy. Upon his arrival, he was shown where a local woman had been cutting grass for her cattle when the tigress pounced, striking her with a fatal blow and then crushing her skull. The woman’s death was instantaneous, but surprisingly, the cat chose to seek refuge elsewhere instead of feeding on the corpse.

Two days later, a man had found the woman’s body, still clutching a clump of grass in one hand and a sickle in the other. The man was also killed by the tigress, which had been lying in wait not far away. For some reason, the tigress fed on the man, but had decided to leave the woman untouched.

A day later, she killed a third villager without any provocation, which elevated her to the top of the wanted list.

Now Corbett was within striking distance of bagging the big cat, unless something unexpected happened. From his vantage point above the tigress, he watched as she left the kill and began to move out on to open ground. Suddenly he was startled by a sound behind him; it was one of the beaters who had retrieved Corbett’s hat that he’d lost during his run through the thorn tunnel.

Corbett thanked the beater, then motioned for him to keep quiet. The tigress was close by, climbing up the opposite bank and walking along the top toward a hill where she would soon be obscured by a thicket of poplar saplings, each about six inches thick. Although he could only see a shadow of the cat moving through the trees, Corbett decided to take the shot.

The blast from his rifle echoed through the valley as the bullet hit a sapling near the cat’s head. The tigress reacted instantly, swinging around and charging down the hill toward Corbett, who realized he was trapped with his back to a sheer 50-foot drop to the stream below.

When the cat was only two yards away, Corbett leaned forward and fired his last bullet, which struck the tiger at the base of her neck. The impact of the 500-caliber bullet pushed the tigress off course, but her momentum carried her past Corbett and over the cliff to where she fell into the stream with a huge splash.

As the villagers and beaters cheered from the cliff-top, the dead cat was hauled up from the stream and laid on a bed of straw for all to see. An hour later, by the light of lanterns and in front of a growing crowd, which by then included several local sportsmen, Corbett skinned the tigress. He found that one of her forelegs had some 50 porcupine quills imbedded under the pad, which had become ingrown. This was obviously what had turned the cat into a man-eater."
 

scumrot derelict

Well-Known Member
20191227_153521.jpg

Just this morning.

We've been feeding a small herd every year since we moved up here. I put down a half-bag of cracked corn every time that I leave the property, and sometimes my daughter likes to drop some apples or carrots. At any point during the day, you can literally look out the window and there's a doe stopping for a drink, or small group taking a nap out in the pine needles. For a while last year they were tame enough to sleep right on the carpet in the fucking garage. It really starts to get nuts around rutting season. Gorgeous animals.
 

SSGrower

Well-Known Member
View attachment 4459018

Just this morning.

We've been feeding a small herd every year since we moved up here. I put down a half-bag of cracked corn every time that I leave the property, and sometimes my daughter likes to drop some apples or carrots. At any point during the day, you can literally look out the window and there's a doe stopping for a drink, or small group taking a nap out in the pine needles. For a while last year they were tame enough to sleep right on the carpet in the fucking garage. It really starts to get nuts around rutting season. Gorgeous animals.
Habituating wildlife is not a good thing, please dont. Too much corn can actually cause them digestive issues too.
 

BarnBuster

Virtually Unknown Member
One of the more frustrating aspects about wildlife crime is when violators get away with a slap on the wrist for their crimes. Prison sentences are exceedingly rare, but one poacher in the Republic of Congo has been ordered to serve 30 years after becoming the first wildlife trafficker to be convicted in Congo.
 
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