Whorled phyllotaxy: stash or trash?

HydroRed

Well-Known Member
Not parroting anything, but passing along information that I was given some 15 or so years ago when i first came across it. The source was someone that I trusted and assumed that information to be true. Sorry for the unintended misinformation. Next time take it down a notch, huh? No need to get angry..



I mostly agree....except the unaffected buds tasted fine. It was only the fasciated (thank you for the correcrion Sativied) bud that tasted bad.
The plant I grew that did this had multiple tops on it that all fasciated. Good for hash maybe? Definitely tasted nothing like the other 11 I grew of the same strain (White Widow from ILGM). Harsh, hashy and leafy as all hell even with a solid trim.
 

jayblaze710

Well-Known Member
Im forming my own theories on the whorled phyllotaxy plants. I suspect it is hybrid vigor induced by two things. If my theory is correct this trait will be see more often on cultivars that were bred and selected indoors as opposed to cultivars bred for selection outdoor. Also if my theory is correct this trait will be seen more often on males or intergender plants that are dominantly males. My theory is that this vigor is a trait of indoor selections based on high production and the elimination of the male contribution to that gene pool. My theory is that this is the plants way of ensuring it's survival against idiots who are selecting for nothing else other than high flower and thc production.

If my theory is correct, and I highly suspect there is something to it, it's actually really cosmically funny and fitting that these selections would warrant mutated and hermed plants. I personally really like the whorled phyllotaxy trait, but then again, it's not the end of the world to me if my plant tosses out a banana, either....
As someone with a background in evolutionary genetics, there is just so much wrong with everything in this post. I hope nobody took any of it seriously.
 

oldfogey420

Active Member
What you describe IS parroting. :) No need to take such a valid, and now by you confirmed, qualification personally. The only reason there is always someone who comes along claiming it’s a polyploid is parroting. If you would know what a polyploid is, you’d know your claim is unsubstantiated. Instead, you merely repeat a label you heard from someone, aka parroting. Stop doing that, pretty please.
I just accepted and admitted that my info was incorrect. Just stand down. Apparently admitting you were wrong just isn't enough anymore. What more did you need oh great and powerful Sativied?

Yes, by definition i parroted. Right you are once again. However, I don't particularly enjoy being lumped in with a group if newbs that spout shit off that they just read in a forum post across the way to try and make themselves appear more knowledgable in this forum here. My info, albeit incorrect, was not achieved in that manner and I wasn't attempting to gain cred either. I passed along info that was given to me by someone very good at his craft many years back. I had no reason to not believe him when he said it was due to polyploidy. He was very knowledgable and was always very helpful if and when i needed it.

Thanks for teaching this old dog something new.

Now stop being a dick, pretty please.
 

oldfogey420

Active Member
Just for clarity... you're not a dick for correcting me. I'm good with that. In fact I learned something after researching fasciation. So thank you. You're a dick for being arrogant about it not once, but twice.
 

Ptek69

Member
Whorled phyllotaxy is nothing to be proud of... its a breeders fuckup in most cases

and not to be confused with 'fox tailing' another breeder/ environment screwup

in most cases both are recessive

just keep in mind we are growing THC here

good luck





Ok i gotta say this is f*****g hilarious.

For starters bud, its genetic mutation, and it simply produces more leaves than the standard 2.

What this means to a plant is more intake of light for the plant, more sugar for the plant and better production overall as a result.

There is no problem in the least with a plant having whirlybird, your plant is simply going to have a better supply of nutrients to cannibilize as it is flowering and it reabsorbs the sugars from the fan leaves to produce those buds that everyone loves.

100% stash in my opinion.

I currently have one growing with whirly bird atm and its a foot taller than the others that were all started at the same time
 

Ptek69

Member
10 plants going in total
All 10 are white queen.

2 ended up looking like they are indica.

1 has whirlybird, 4 main stems and a random 5th stem because 1 split into 2.
The other 7 all look like sativa.

Its kinda interesting what you can end up with from plants, all the seeds are auto fem at least.

Kinda wondering if i clone the mutant plant if it will act the same way still with the growth pattern for the stem.

Cause i couldnt have asked for a nicer plant even if it did mutate
 

vostok

Well-Known Member
Ok i gotta say this is f*****g hilarious.

For starters bud, its genetic mutation, and it simply produces more leaves than the standard 2.

What this means to a plant is more intake of light for the plant, more sugar for the plant and better production overall as a result.

There is no problem in the least with a plant having whirlybird, your plant is simply going to have a better supply of nutrients to cannibilize as it is flowering and it reabsorbs the sugars from the fan leaves to produce those buds that everyone loves.

100% stash in my opinion.

I currently have one growing with whirly bird atm and its a foot taller than the others that were all started at the same time
Whorled phyllotaxy is nothing to be proud of... its a breeders fuckup as in genetic mutation

the US weed market is now so healthy the ignorant have yet to see the forest for the trees

good for you glad you could spare the time to join our tiny site ...bummer!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolutionary_history_of_plants basic 101

good luck
 

Sativied

Well-Known Member
Whorled phyllotaxy is nothing to be proud of... its a breeders fuckup as in genetic mutation

the US weed market is now so healthy the ignorant have yet to see the forest for the trees

good for you glad you could spare the time to join our tiny site ...bummer!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolutionary_history_of_plants basic 101

good luck
Almost every single feature every living organism has is a result of a genetic mutation, idiot. In case of cannabis any and all traits are a result of a genetic mutation. Breeding new varieties is all about breeding what were originally genetic mutations from one or more plants into a population. Unless of course you are a Creationist.

DNA & Mutations - Understanding Evolution:
https://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/mutations_01

“Mutations are essential to evolution; they are the raw material of genetic variation. Without mutation, evolution could not occur.”

If rollie were ever to delete your account and posts this site would be a whole percentile less stupid.
 

Ptek69

Member
Whorled phylotaxy has zero downside.
Wasnt looking to have a plant with it, but i am certainly enjoying its faster growth rates and how bushy it is.

You may view it as a bad thing, but higher yeilds is never a bad thing.

I on the other hand view it as bigger is better , and alot more stuff to make edibles with.
 

Sativied

Well-Known Member
I’ve grown over a hundred, several different varieties/crosses (all based on a quad dad), pictures of many of them on several forums including here. The only downside is that some turn out fasciated. Fasciation and whorled phyllotaxy are both a result of a different than usual regulation of the hormones cytokinin and auxins.

But yes, whorled phyllotaxy is a better phyllotaxy for the obvious reasons. Doesn’t mean every plant with whorled phyllotaxy is better than every regular plant of course.
 

TimBar

Well-Known Member
I have a Swami Kahuna X Cherry Bomb growing now that is Whorled - started as 3 and is now at quads...The best part is the red stems showing....that is what shows on good Greengenes Cherry Bomb ...probably have to clone this one.
 

ANC

Well-Known Member
2 of 4 beans I planted from my African landrace x genuine exodus cut cross, so far are showing whorled phyllotaxy.
I planted a bunch of other beans at the same time, but only this cross did this

The one is a pretty robust little seedling.
 

Sativied

Well-Known Member
People have no business giving advice when that advice spreads misinformation. Genetic mutation is caused by too few or too many chromosomes in the genetic sequence.
No, that’s down syndrome. :lol: With such an utterly erroneous statement, you should take your own advice about giving advice.
 

oldfogey420

Active Member
For the record, nor is a recessive gene the same as a genetic mutation. A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA, whereas a recessive gene is just a non-dominant gene; one that requires two copies to display whatever that gene controls, such as blue eyes in humans.
 

Ksmooth

Member
No, that’s down syndrome. :lol: With such an utterly erroneous statement, you should take your own advice about giving advice.
there is quite a bit of data to support the many different variants of genetic mutation in plants. Bro science is not one of them. You cannot absolutely say a plant mutation is caused by dirty tools or the breeder directly. That’s bro science and not true. The reference to Down syndrome is applicable, except we are talking about random groups of plant cells rather than chromosomes. Mutations can absolutely occur from environmental or chemical influences.. but to immediately say “it’s the breeder” is erroneous. Mutations DO happen naturally without human influence.
 

oldfogey420

Active Member
Don't those mutations occur as a direct result of stress in the environment? Yes. As an indoor grower/breeder, dont you have total control over your plants' environment? Yes. So, the grower is responsible for the mutation, whatever the exact cause may be, dirty tools (I'm not buying that one 100%), virus, mold, chemicals, temperature, lighting, soil structure and content, etc..
 
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