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What are your essential nutrients and supplements for your plants?

Discussion in 'Advanced Marijuana Cultivation' started by Ivan___, Nov 4, 2017.

  1.  
    since1991

    since1991 Well-Known Member

    Dr. Who..you aint no rooty poot. I getcha. You know the time of day when it comes to being a green thumb. Some of them organics got to be broken down. !!!!
     
    Dr. Who likes this.
  2.  
    since1991

    since1991 Well-Known Member

    Promix Hp is good shit. If you know how to feed..its damn near a perfect substrate. I too wanna know more about rice hull as an amendment. Does it give up silica like an addy (Protekt - Potassium Silica)??? Anyways...back in the day...before coco coir..I use to blow through peat soilless mixes. Sunshine#4 and Promix to be exact. Always mixed 20 % wiggle worm castings as well.
     
    Chunky Stool likes this.
  3.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    Ever try calcined clay instead of perlite?
    It holds water, has a high CEC, and plants love it!
     
    since1991 and Tyleb173rd like this.
  4.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    I used to use it my self for the double dig method of starting outdoor planting beds. I stopped when I started noticing that almost all of the perlite in it was crushed to dust from the pressure of being bailed.
     
    since1991 likes this.
  5.  
    Tyleb173rd

    Tyleb173rd Well-Known Member

    Not yet. I actually bought some kitty litter a few days ago but I believe it’s the wrong kind. My guess is it was sodium bentonite and not calcium.
     
    since1991 and Chunky Stool like this.
  6.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    I've never seen perlite that had a consistent size. If you want consistent particle size, you've gotta screen it yourself.
    There's no way baling pressure causes the perlite in promix to crumble.
    Why do you care anyway? Consistent particle size is what matters if you want lots of void space.
    Otherwise, the smallest particles will fill all of the cavities. In this case, peat would be the filler.
    Perlite is added to reduce the amount of water a given volume of soil can hold -- not aerate it.
     
    since1991 and Tyleb173rd like this.
  7.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    I did a batch comparing results with hydroton and was really impressed with the difference. I'm not sure that it's the type of clay you're talking about but it's definitely a good alternative perlite. Also check out diatomite rock. The whole rock is permanently noncompactable and has good air/water holding capacity.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
    since1991 likes this.
  8.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    I think bentonite is the "clumping" variety, which isn't what you want. Calcined clay has the consistency of ground up bricks and will not clump -- ever.
    I like "Special Kitty" all natural from Wal-mart. Been using it for a couple of years and have zero complaints. Plants totally dig it!
     
    since1991 and Tyleb173rd like this.
  9.  
    Tyleb173rd

    Tyleb173rd Well-Known Member

    Yes!! Special Kitty!! That’s what I was looking for. The next time I’m out that way I’ll pick it up.
     
    since1991 likes this.
  10.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    I'm really not concerned with how consistent the size is. I'd think that a little variation would actually help. As far as the perlite being crushed into dust from bailing I've seen it myself. Open up a bail and more often than not everything that looks like a piece of perlite is already a pile of dust. I don't think that particles that small are going to do much for improving soil texture. Even the manager and other employees of the store I go to agreed about not using bailed soil for the same reason.

    Perlite is meant to improve texture. It will hold more water than some types of soil after being watered but will also hold pockets of air after the soil has had a chance to dry out bit. Look at almost any soil mix made for high drainage/aeration and they will, more often than not, have a higher ratio of perlite.

    It's beneficial for improving soil in either direction except for the fact that it doesn't keep its consistency for very long. It's no big deal if you're not reusing your soil or using it in long term planting beds but I'd at least make sure that the perlite hasn't been crushed into dust before you even buy it.
     
    since1991 likes this.
  11.  
    since1991

    since1991 Well-Known Member

    Fukin grow nerds. I love it.
     
  12.  
    Abiqua

    Abiqua Well-Known Member

    Calcium.....you can recover from ANY other kind of deficiency, but not Ca, if you don't have enough for the start, you will never catch up.....
     
    since1991 likes this.
  13.  
    since1991

    since1991 Well-Known Member

    Iam willing to bet most growers provide plenty of calcium to they crops. But calcium is one of the "problem" minerals in that it can easliy get "stopped" from moving around. Growroom climate temps and rh plays a big factor. As well as medium substrate and pH. Its also what's called an immobile nutrient...meaning once its shuttled into a spot..it doesn't move to another if that spot needs it more. Its not particular to cannabis either. Tomato and many other fruiting crops can have calcium problems as well. Largely depending on climate. Using natural chelates like humics/fulvics and amino acids especially glycine can get stubborn calcium moving.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
  14.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    Immobile nutrient deficiencies can never be corrected in the tissues where they first present but new growth won't be affected after correcting for it.
     
    since1991 likes this.
  15.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    You totally ignored what I said about particle size and void space (air pockets). Ever heard of a Perched Water Table (PWT)?
    Maybe this will help:
    http://forums2.gardenweb.com/discussions/1423691/container-soils-water-movement-and-retention-xvi
     
  16.  
    Flowki

    Flowki Well-Known Member

    Is it possible you can have a no til pot that you keep adding new top layers too, cut out the old stem leave in the old roots and put in an established cutting?.
     
  17.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    "No till" works better with large pots (30+ gal).
    Soil in smaller pots usually collapses & becomes compacted after a couple of grows.
     
  18.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    No till beds need crop rotation and/or cover crops to work right. The best thing to do for go tainer gardens is to rols.
     
  19.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    I didn't ignore it at all. The perlite I've seen in bailed soils is literally reduced to dust. There may be around 50% of it that isn't those are very small bits left over from the larger pieces that weren't completely destroyed.

    I considered what you said before responding and decided that the "voids" created by tiny pieces of perlite and what amounts to dust are negligible and irrelevant, respectively.
     
  20.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    Read the article I provided.
    If you're not careful, you might actually learn something...
     

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