A perfect cure every time

FastFreddi

Well-Known Member
My wife is thrifty...she loves Value Village( not now obviously, and yes she is Jonesing) so I had a good supply already.
Big box stores, on your next supply run, grab some either yardwork or green bin bags...if you are careful, they last multiple harvests.
FF
 


This method is particularly effective for folks who are starting out, those looking to maximize quality in a shorter period of time, and folks who's like to produce a connoisseur-quality product each and every time with no guesswork involved.

It's a very simple and effective process:

Cut the product, trim it per your preference, but don't dry it until the stems snap. Take it down while the stems still have some flex, but the product feel dry on the outside. This is a perfect opportunity to drop the dry-feeling flowers onto a screen and collect prime-quality kief that would otherwise get lost in the jar.

Jar the product, along with a Caliber III hygrometer. One can be had on Ebay for ~$20. Having tested a number of hygrometers - digital and analog - this model in particular produced consistent, accurate results. The Hydroset/Xikar hygrometers are also recommend after calibration. Then, watch the readings:

+70% RH - too wet, needs to sit outside the jar to dry for 12-24 hours, depending.

65-70% RH - the product is almost in the cure zone, if you will. It can be slowly brought to optimum RH by opening the lid for 2-4 hours.

60-65% RH - the stems snap, the product feels a bit sticky, and it is curing.

55-60% RH - at this point it can be stored for an extended period (3 months or more) without worrying about mold. The product will continue to cure.

Below 55% RH - the RH is too low for the curing process to take place. The product starts to feel brittle. Once you've hit this point, nothing will make it better. Adding moisture won't restart the curing process; it will just make the product wet. If you measure a RH below 55% don't panic. Read below:

Obviously, the product need time to sweat in the jar. As such, accurate readings won't be seen for ~24 hours, assuming the flowers are in the optimal cure zone. If you're curing the product for long-term storage, give the flowers 4-5 days for an accurate reading. If the product is sill very wet, a +70% RH reading will show within hours. If you see the RH rising ~1% per hour, keep a close eye on the product, as it's likely too moist.


HTH,
Simon
Well put, and helpful. I basically ruined four months of my life a cpl months ago. Patience isn’t just a river in Egypt.
 

iriemartin1974

Well-Known Member
The whole topic of curing is as much philosophy as its a science. This debate probably was at the beginning of riu.org and will outlive all of us.. If the perfect cure was discovered and this information sold to the public that knowledge would outsell boner pills. Not that I need them.!?! LOL
 

Pedro Pereira

Active Member
I have this problem that sometimes my buds will not keep the consistency after harvesting... I dry them and then they get a bit mushy or airy... maybe I'm not curing them well or enough?
 

Gemtree

Well-Known Member
I have this problem that sometimes my buds will not keep the consistency after harvesting... I dry them and then they get a bit mushy or airy... maybe I'm not curing them well or enough?
You have to sweat them till they are stable. It draws the moisture out from the middle.
 
Technology similar ... they both “ push and pull “ moisture. Some say boveda robs smell , I have never experienced that myself.
But run perpetuals all year so my “ stock “ on hand can be quite large , bovedas are mainly for stabilizing the base Rh within.
Some growers prefer 58% or so over 62% packs , but they only have that one job to do , stabilize the Rh.

Integras have a better design ( indicator dot ) to show viability at a glance. Color change indicates if pack is no longer any good.
I use both but with integras I can see the pack in my jars and now their status.
 

2Hearts

Well-Known Member
Wtf how longs a pack last? Thought they woukd be eternal working.


Technology similar ... they both “ push and pull “ moisture. Some say boveda robs smell , I have never experienced that myself.
But run perpetuals all year so my “ stock “ on hand can be quite large , bovedas are mainly for stabilizing the base Rh within.
Some growers prefer 58% or so over 62% packs , but they only have that one job to do , stabilize the Rh.

Integras have a better design ( indicator dot ) to show viability at a glance. Color change indicates if pack is no longer any good.
I use both but with integras I can see the pack in my jars and now their status.
 

TreeFarmerCharlie

Well-Known Member
Wtf how longs a pack last? Thought they woukd be eternal working.
They pretty much work for years and years but can dry out after they’ve been opened and aren’t kept in a sealed container. They can also be recharged by putting them in a box with a humidifier running for a couple of days.
 

KingQuazy

Well-Known Member
They pretty much work for years and years but can dry out after they’ve been opened and aren’t kept in a sealed container. They can also be recharged by putting them in a box with a humidifier running for a couple of days.
I was under the impression you should only use then 2 or 3 times, if that. But I also only seen them used in professional environments. So idk.
 

iriemartin1974

Well-Known Member
I have this problem that sometimes my buds will not keep the consistency after harvesting... I dry them and then they get a bit mushy or airy... maybe I'm not curing them well or enough?
To make them look like typical bud place them in a ziplock bag and put a pillow on top of the bag. Slight pressure.. You will lose some tric's though. Not completely dry though.. Its just a way to make the buds look typical.
 

neal62

Active Member
I was under the impression you should only use then 2 or 3 times, if that. But I also only seen them used in professional environments. So idk.
When mine dry up i put them in a bowl of distilled water and let them sit for a day or two works fine.
 
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