A perfect cure every time

Brickie74

Member


This method is particularly effective for folks who are starting out, those looking to maximize quality in a shorter period of time, and folks who's like to produce a connoisseur-quality product each and every time with no guesswork involved.

It's a very simple and effective process:

Cut the product, trim it per your preference, but don't dry it until the stems snap. Take it down while the stems still have some flex, but the product feel dry on the outside. This is a perfect opportunity to drop the dry-feeling flowers onto a screen and collect prime-quality kief that would otherwise get lost in the jar.

Jar the product, along with a Caliber III hygrometer. One can be had on Ebay for ~$20. Having tested a number of hygrometers - digital and analog - this model in particular produced consistent, accurate results. The Hydroset/Xikar hygrometers are also recommend after calibration. Then, watch the readings:

+70% RH - too wet, needs to sit outside the jar to dry for 12-24 hours, depending.

65-70% RH - the product is almost in the cure zone, if you will. It can be slowly brought to optimum RH by opening the lid for 2-4 hours.

60-65% RH - the stems snap, the product feels a bit sticky, and it is curing.

55-60% RH - at this point it can be stored for an extended period (3 months or more) without worrying about mold. The product will continue to cure.

Below 55% RH - the RH is too low for the curing process to take place. The product starts to feel brittle. Once you've hit this point, nothing will make it better. Adding moisture won't restart the curing process; it will just make the product wet. If you measure a RH below 55% don't panic. Read below:

Obviously, the product need time to sweat in the jar. As such, accurate readings won't be seen for ~24 hours, assuming the flowers are in the optimal cure zone. If you're curing the product for long-term storage, give the flowers 4-5 days for an accurate reading. If the product is sill very wet, a +70% RH reading will show within hours. If you see the RH rising ~1% per hour, keep a close eye on the product, as it's likely too moist.


HTH,
Simon
Wow....I actually started Curing this way on my own about a year ago. I’m glad to see I’m not an idiot. It actually works much much better than waiting until the stems snap. The problem with the stem snapping method is that all the buds on the stem are not the same size and are not going to dry at the same rate or be dry at the same time. So this method actually works really well.
 

FireBudzz420

Well-Known Member
How long should i use the automated curing technique befor storing in plain mason jars? Or should i just auto burp them 2x a day for a month then put in plain jars with the baveda or integra rh packs? Also I'll by drying the whole plant minus the fan leafs thanks.
 

PioneerValleyOG

Well-Known Member
One very important note I can't stress enough Is to always KEEP YOUR BUDS IN DARKNESS!! Light is the killer that takes the green away and turns buds brown and ooogie. I use the packets for long term storage, big ball jars, and a slow cure process in my basement, NEVER the attic, maybe for a couple days towards the end, but always use these guys15968370083161533303885329514298.jpg
I have like six of them, and they can be a very useful tool for the curing process. I also like the paper bags, another hint is an ammonia smell means your process is not finished properly. As I am no professional curer, I just can't afford the toys, I cure as I grow, as simply as possible. Somehow, it all comes together. Maybe I'll actually document my process this year, lol, I am doing a grow journal this year so why not? Luck to all!!!
 

mattman089

Active Member
One very important note I can't stress enough Is to always KEEP YOUR BUDS IN DARKNESS!! Light is the killer that takes the green away and turns buds brown and ooogie. I use the packets for long term storage, big ball jars, and a slow cure process in my basement, NEVER the attic, maybe for a couple days towards the end, but always use these guysView attachment 4647077
I have like six of them, and they can be a very useful tool for the curing process. I also like the paper bags, another hint is an ammonia smell means your process is not finished properly. As I am no professional curer, I just can't afford the toys, I cure as I grow, as simply as possible. Somehow, it all comes together. Maybe I'll actually document my process this year, lol, I am doing a grow journal this year so why not? Luck to all!!!
These work great too.. Very small and a 2 pack os only $5. I bought several of them lol.


 

2com

Well-Known Member
Guys, you can get wireless, mini hygrometers from several brands now that will allow you to monitor rh and/or temp from a device without having to open and check the jar/bucket/etc.
Boveda, Sensor push, Inkbird, Govee (I think?). Then there are humidor ones (non wifi), digital ones too. Or you could mod a bucket/container with an actual hygrostat/controller, make it "burp" for you.
 

SmittyB..

Well-Known Member
Guys, you can get wireless, mini hygrometers from several brands now that will allow you to monitor rh and/or temp from a device without having to open and check the jar/bucket/etc.
Boveda, Sensor push, Inkbird, Govee (I think?). Then there are humidor ones (non wifi), digital ones too. Or you could mod a bucket/container with an actual hygrostat/controller, make it "burp" for you.
Do you currently use these or have a modded bucket?
 

2com

Well-Known Member
The guy linked above (derrick gilman) who did the auto burp buckets runs his based on a timer. All you'd have to do is replace the timer with, say, an inkbird rh controller. You could only put the sensor in one of the buckets or containers though (no worse than just going off timer/once per day though?). Cut the sensor cable, run it through a grommet/cable gland, splice back together.. or similar way.

I don't. I have all the parts and stuff, but I haven't bothered yet as I'm still learning and trying to do get the feel for what needs doing before I try and automate it (other than controlling environment).

There's a video on youtube where someone uses an axial fan in a bucket for the burping but I can't remember if he uses rh control or timer.
 

SmittyB..

Well-Known Member
Yea I seen his vid. I’ve seen one other YouTuber do the same. May venture down that road one day. Just wondering on others experiences.
 

2com

Well-Known Member
Yea I seen his vid. I’ve seen one other YouTuber do the same. May venture down that road one day. Just wondering on others experiences.
I'll tell ya something else I'm considering is what the diy meat curing hobby guys do, and re-purpose a fridge into a curing chamber. Kinda limited space though.
Maybe build a box using rigid insulation. They make ac units for campers that sit outside and duct (and out, cycle) in the cold air. Or one could modify a different unit to duct it in. It's a challenge.
 

waterproof808

Well-Known Member
I'll tell ya something else I'm considering is what the diy meat curing hobby guys do, and re-purpose a fridge into a curing chamber. Kinda limited space though.
Maybe build a box using rigid insulation. They make ac units for campers that sit outside and duct (and out, cycle) in the cold air. Or one could modify a different unit to duct it in. It's a challenge.
They sell something called a "curidor." Its basically a repurposed wine cooler.
 

Edie

New Member
Jar 1 of 6 just spent the night at 58%. Ready to smoke!
The rest are at about 62%-65%.

Another perfect cure.

I have been using cheapo hygrometers from china that cost $5 on ebay. They have been within 1-2% of my nice hygrometers.
I got some too but they read different RH%?
from 55% to 63%
 

BobCajun

Well-Known Member
I don't believe you need to burp anything. What would the purpose be? Only reason you would keep letting room air in is if it's still too moist and you want to dry it more, if the room air is the right RH. While it's closed the moisture would equalize through the material and also the air in the container, so if you wanted the material to get drier you would need to open it and let drier air in and close it to let it equalize again. But if you had already dries it to 62% there would be no purpose in opening and closing the container.

The guy in that video about the plastic buckets said he dried his plants in a 62% RH room before he put it in the buckets, so why was he pumping air in the buckets and letting it out? Logically, all that would do is expose the material to more oxygen, which would degrade it. Obviously no "curing" was taking place because the RH was too low at 62%. What he was doing was letting the terps permeate through the material because the vapor is contained in the closed buckets, so you would smell it more. Aside from that it's just "aging" not curing, and aging does not require air exchange, in fact you want to avoid it by keeping the container sealed and preferably under a vacuum.

That guy did all that stuff with the hoses and the pump for no good reason whatsoever, just because people have been known to burp jars because their weed was too wet so he assumed it had something to do with curing, which it doesn't. He could have just left the weed in the closed buckets with a 62% Boveda and not bothered with the hoses. Then after apparently 3 weeks, from what he said, the terps will have permeated the material. In fact, you could sit a small container on top of the weed with some terpenes on paper towel or whatever and it would permeate the material giving it whatever aroma he wanted. You want some orange smelling and tasting weed, you would use orange essential oil. You want it to smell like pine, you would use turpentine. Actually that gives me an idea. I have a little bottle of peppermint oil, I think I'll make me some peppermint weed.
 
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Bagginski

Well-Known Member
Not much to add to Hiker's comments. Good post. Above are a couple of pics showing the kief that just fell out of the bud. That's right, it fell out. You can see by its color that we're essentially dealing with first sift quality.

Simon
A few thoughts on the de-kiffing rationale (Simon, please correct if I go astray)

A variable amount of trichomes will be shed easily by the buds, no matter what.
They will stick to the stems, they will stick to other vegetative bits, they will stick to the jar, they will stick to the hygrometer...and they’ll fall off *every* time you remove your buds to air them out. Trichome collection is how hash is made, so the question is ‘do you care enough to try and keep these tasty bits, or not? If you don’t, they will fall anyway, get bumped off, get lost, get smeared onto things, become a (relatively) sticky mess...or you can make a minimal effort up from to keep them from getting lost, getting wasted, makIng a sticky mess.

if you’ve gone to all the time and effort and attention to get to the curing stage, it just makes sense to collect as much of it as you (easily) can, up front; *how* exactly isn’t even an issue, but by collecting on the front end, you end of with more good stuff and less waste. After all, you’ll be emptying the jar fairly often - that waste can add up...and you might decide on your own that you should have been gathering it, not leaving it on the table. Every time you handle them during the dry/cure process, you’ll be potentially wasting good stuff; collect up-front, waste less, be happy.

Pretty straightforward and simple, really. HOW you do it is, well, a personal decision...but it’s not complicated.
 

Warfrat

New Member
Simon Wattz Up Bruh I Was Wondering If You Are Anybody In This Thread Has Ever Heard Of Or Used The Boveda 62% Humidipaks? I've Recently Purchased Some Along With Some Cvault Containers And Have Yet To Use Them But I Pretty Sure They Are Gonna Do The Trick! They Were Featured in HighTimes And Every Review I've Read From Growers Who Use Them Were Positive. All You Gotta Do Is Dry Your Buds Until Your Stems Almost Snap, Drop Your Buds In The Jar Along With Your Boveda Humidipak And BOOM! You're Done! No Burping, No Opening Your Jars! The trick is to leave the proper moisture content in the bud, in relation to it’s particular density. Relative humidity, and air temperature when jarring will play a role as well. Leaving just enough water and air to allow the "Beneficial" bacteria to feed on the chlorophyll And Starch, but not enough to proliferate throughout the jar. When they run out of air, they die. So opening the jar is counterproductive to curing. The Humidipaks Will Lower Or Raise The Rh To 62%. I Think These Paks Are A Must Have For Beginners And A Nice Addition To The Experienced Growers Arsenal Of "Pot Growing Gadgets"! kiss-ass
I just ordered some of those
 
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