Unconventional Organics

DANKSWAG

Well-Known Member
Using milk on your compost and in your garden will probably come as a surprise to most. Upon closer inspection, however, it starts to make sense. The amino acids, proteins, enzymes and natural sugars that make milk a food for humans and animals are the same ingredients in nurturing healthy communities of microbes, fungi and beneficial bacteria in your compost and garden soil.


read more http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/milk-and-molasses-magic-zbcz1402.aspx#axzz2w0dnplCV
I use low fat milk with acidophilus added with 10 parts rainwater as foliar to rid and prevent powdery mildew.
Then what I don't drink that spoils goes to compost.

DankSwag
 

dankesthours182

Well-Known Member
This is a common practice in many parts of the world/cultures. My buddy pulled a quick switch this spring because his daughters tree didn't make it through the winter. He timed it right and she just thought it got a slow start that spring! Its ok IMO all life comes from death with microbes doing the magic transition! Its just like planting a corn kernel in a fish carcass back in the day.

Instead of buying your kid a case of wine from the year of their birth, I was thinking the cannabis version would be like grow a dank plant with your childs placenta tea then make hash and save it for when you bust them toking. So this is "your hash"... and I only want you smoking the good stuff kid. Me personally I'd rather have that than a case of aged bordeau any day!

I still have my daughters (heart shaped, rare!) placenta in the freezer, maybe I will use it to make some tea on some plants like I said above. I did pump the water and afterbirth (home birth was great!) from the puddle birth (we were gonna do a water birth but she came when it was only 5" full!) right into my tomato bed and they are doing great this year even though they got seeded late by a new dad gardener who was about one and a half months behind schedule. MMmmm homegrown tomatoes, one thing I LOVE about late summer.
And this tops it, best part of the forums is right here, where it turns out we are growing our top shelf on dead puppies and piss, mostly
 

dankesthours182

Well-Known Member
I use it and it works great... Living water for living soils.
I use a powerhead to circulate and oxygenate the water. Stagnant water produces gram negative bacilli and fungi which can be pathogenic. If you have municipal water that has chloramine, you can add up to a max of 30% by volume into your holding reservoir. The bacteria will feed off the chloramine so tap water will actually help keep your water alive. I actually stopped using water conditioners to my aquariums over 10 years ago and remove only 20%, once a week and replace it with water straight out the tap and the plants and fish love it and in turn provide me with what I consider an awesome source of water.

EDIT: If you don't have tap water with chloramine, you can add a 1/4tsp of ammonia or a small sprinkle of your pee per 20 gal. of water every 3 to 5 days to keep your stored aquarium water alive.
My cats love a good 30/30/30 mix of rested tap water, filtered tap and tap, I read they like the chlorine, I think it helps mitigate the high levels of bacteria they would otherwise be using to digest raw food and associated bacteria. But just a theory, I like a little chlorine too sometimes

I really am dying to get a fish tank to try fishganics haha aquaponics!
 

Johnei

Well-Known Member
One of the ingredients I use in my soil mix that I've been reusing for about 10 years now is when adding some ammendments back to the soil after a crop, I add organic hulled hemp seeds to the soil. :D
 

CaptainSnap

Well-Known Member
Anyone ever use or see cherry stones for chicken grit? Claims on the bag it's perfect for container areation. However I saw aluminum oxide was at 3 to 4 percent! I'm trying to get away from perlite when I recycle my soil.
 

MrKnotty

Well-Known Member
Hello fellow microbe nerds! Just thought I share some cool stuff I did this run. First is fermenting cannabis plants. Every time I topped I saved them, and fermented them. Plants absolutely loved when I fed the soil this concoction. I also fermented cannabis flowers that I cleaned out from the middle of my plants after they have been flipped for a month. Haven't used that one yet, but will when my outdoor goes into flower. Also dandelions are amazing to ferment. The ladies love those dandelion microbes when they are in flower! And for any other northern California residents, I fermented Star Thistle this year for veg. AMAZING! Try it next year and will be so happy you did!!!! Peace
 

cannetix Inc

Well-Known Member
I've experimented with organic vegetable glycerine (Glycerol) as a foliar spray with interesting results. According to the following story from Penn State Universities' news department, Glycerol "is easily absorbed by the leaves where it converts to a bioactive form known as glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) which then reacts with a fatty acid species called oleic acid and changes the fatty acid profile of the cells."



Long story short, in some model plant species, certain types of glycerol-related fatty acids appear to trigger plants defense mechanisms protecting plants against various pests including powdery mildew and is 100% flavourless & odorless so is safe to use on buds upto 2 weeks pre-harvest in my personal experience.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24863347 Application of glycerol as a foliar spray activates the defense response and enhances disease resistance of Theobroma cacao.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5030236/
Application of Glycerol for Induced Powdery Mildew Resistance in Triticum aestivum L.
 

Chunky Stool

Well-Known Member
I've experimented with organic vegetable glycerine (Glycerol) as a foliar spray with interesting results. According to the following story from Penn State Universities' news department, Glycerol "is easily absorbed by the leaves where it converts to a bioactive form known as glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) which then reacts with a fatty acid species called oleic acid and changes the fatty acid profile of the cells."



Long story short, in some model plant species, certain types of glycerol-related fatty acids appear to trigger plants defense mechanisms protecting plants against various pests including powdery mildew and is 100% flavourless & odorless so is safe to use on buds upto 2 weeks pre-harvest in my personal experience.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24863347 Application of glycerol as a foliar spray activates the defense response and enhances disease resistance of Theobroma cacao.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5030236/
Application of Glycerol for Induced Powdery Mildew Resistance in Triticum aestivum L.
Chitin also triggers plant defense mechanisms. Insect frass, bat guano, crab shell, etc...
 

DonTesla

Well-Known Member
If Anyone has links to where to buy Prime Nutrients aka Better World insect frass please share cause that brand did wayyyy better than these last couple I have found.. Not a huge fan of plain mealworm frass etc but better world had amazing results.. I'd love to start making frass however they do it, cause it was gram for gram way more impressive.
Thanks all!
 

Fastslappy

Well-Known Member
20171022_173440.jpg
If Anyone has links to where to buy Prime Nutrients aka Better World insect frass please share cause that brand did wayyyy better than these last couple I have found.. Not a huge fan of plain mealworm frass etc but better world had amazing results.. I'd love to start making frass however they do it, cause it was gram for gram way more impressive.
Thanks all!
Stuff I get is soldier fly frass good shit
 
Last edited:

Fastslappy

Well-Known Member
Does NPK vary between brands? The stuff I use is 2-2-2, but I have no clue what they fed the insects.
Hell I don't even know what kind of insect pooped it out... :eyesmoke:
Some has more protein (insect parts ) but yeah what they eat , some r fed slaughter house bone to clean ,that hi protein stuff , if u get June bugs that cover sidewalks they r frass too
 

DonTesla

Well-Known Member
Crickets and mealworms are lower grade, I think. The soldier flies are a step up I do believe. Are there any fungal numbers to go with that Synergy brand by chance @Fastslappy
 
Anyone ever use or see cherry stones for chicken grit? Claims on the bag it's perfect for container areation. However I saw aluminum oxide was at 3 to 4 percent! I'm trying to get away from perlite when I recycle my soil.
I actually tried crushed walnut shells instead of perlite this time. It did make the soil much lighter and gave my worms some grit at the same time. From what I understand they also contain nutrients when broken down.
 
Crickets and mealworms are lower grade, I think
Speaking of meal worms I have been adding frass from Super Worms. They are much larger than meal worms and they come in fine wood chips. Once my Bearded Dragon is done eating the super worms I add the crap to my compost. I know that super worms are high in Phosphorus so I would assume so is there crap. Maybe it would be good to add a decent amount during flower.
 

Michiganjesse

Well-Known Member
Couldn't agree more...I was just trying to say it a bit more subtly haha. Good to keep him in check tho...after that post I went around reading a bunch of his other posts and they were similarly misinformative...gotta watch out for those folks on RIU...its like 90% of the people on here lol.
I thought most peeps knew there stuff on here
 
>
Top